Schlagwort-Archive: confidence

Miss Lira in interview

„Aaaah Germany! I could live in Germany“

(Autorin/ Editor: Nadja Krupke)

Deutsche Interview-Zusammenfassung:

Die Top-Musikerin Lira gab ihre Karriere als Wirtschaftsprüferin auf, um die südafrikanische Gesellschaft mit ihren eigenen künstlerischen Interpretationen zu bereichern und Gefühle greifbar zu gestalten. Lira sieht die Musik als Zufluchtsort, den der Mensch braucht, um Erfahrungen und Realitäten zu verarbeiten. Inspiriert wird sie zum Beispiel von Ikonen wie Nelson Mandela und Oprah Winfrey, die ein enormes soziales Engagement bewiesen haben. Ihr neues Album soll Hoffnung, Geborgenheit und Glück versprühen, sagt sie. Negative Eigenschaften, die den Alltag prägen, will sie mit ihrer Musik bekämpfen und den Seelen der Menschen eine Pause gönnen. Lira wurde in Deutschland schon mehrfach vom Publikum herzlich empfangen – ob in Stuttgart, Berlin, Würzburg, Frankfurt oder Konstanz. Die Sängerin schätzt Deutschland sehr und könnte hier sogar leben, sagt sie. Ihr großes Ziel für die Zukunft ist es aber in den USA ihren Durchbruch als Musikstar zu schaffen und anderen südafrikanischen Künstlern Hoffnung auf internationalen Erfolg zu ermöglichen.

© Miss Lira, one of the most famous singer from South Africa. She is counting to the handful of really successful musicians. A superstar, who ist using her voice to create a positive change in South African society and to be an example of possibility for all citizens.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: We would like to welcome the singer Miss Lira on „SÜDAFRIKA – Land der Kontraste“, the German gateway to South Africa . You started your career towards the business world. Why did you choose to study Internal Auditing and Financial Accounting?

Answer: It came about because Accounting was my favourite subject at school. I was not allowed to study music as my parents felt that it would be wiser to have something more “solid” to fall back on. A career in finance seemed logical because I enjoyed accounting and Business studies as subjects.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff:  When first did you realize that you were born to sing and not sit behind a desk and what was the essential reason for you to give up everything you knew and to go in a completely different direction?

Answer: Growing up I saw the power of music at work among my family members and within my South African community. The elders would play music night and day and I observed what it could do to a people, but did not understand how. There were songs of struggle that seemed to give words to what people were feeling but could not articulate. It seemed to comfort those who could not express their pain. It seemed to give people an escape from their undesired reality. I was intrigued by this and wanted to be able to do the same – – make people feel that they could express their emotions when my music played.

When I was an undergraduate student, studying accounting I used my skills to exchange for recording time at a local studio. I had my first demo at the age of 18. When I graduated, I continued in accounting for a couple years. But soon turned in my letter of resignation and created a five-year plan for my music career. My mother made it kind of easy for me because she said “well since you have something to fall back on I’d rather have you happy”. So in those initial days, my mother was the motivation I needed. It helps when a parent is open to the idea of you pursuing your dreams.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: Since you have devoted your life to music, you have been extremely successful, where do you get your inspiration?

Answer: I’m inspired by so much – Nelson Mandela and Oprah are at the top of my list. I am inspired by the fact that these two individuals have done so much with their lives and impacted so many. I recently was moved by Steve Jobs achievements in a similar way. I’m also inspired by observing people going about their lives and by my own life experiences.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: What are your messages you wish to utter through your music?

Answer: The music upbeat, it’s a real feel good album. I want listeners to feel great when listening to it. I know life is tough and the global economy places people is an uneasy space… my music brings messages of hope, comfort, celebration. It’s meant to make you feel good through all of life’s trials and tribulations. I think there’s enough negativity out there in the world and I have no desire to add to it. People seek solace in music and I want mine to be an uplifting experience. We’ve all gone through hardships and we have had to overcome a lot. My music stand’s out because it focuses on the possibilities of life.

Lira in concert during World Cup 2010: Pata Pata composed by Miriam Makeba

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: Do your songs capture a certain reality that is found in South Africa ?

Answer: I’ve noticed that some of my perceptions are influenced by my South Africa upbringing, which is the experience of apartheid, the transition into a democratic government and then having to figure out what to do with our new found freedom. I was determined if nothing else to use my voice and gift to create a positive change and to be an example of possibility for South Africans. There are only a handful of really successful musicians in South Africa and there’s only so much we can do in our small territory but I’ve been fortunate to break many barriers.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: How much would it mean to you, to seize the international music industrie and what do you think this would mean for South Africa?

Answer: It means that anything is truly possible for anyone who focuses on achieving a goal. South Africans know my journey and they have seen me turn my failures into a success. I have positively influenced many people by merely following my dreams – Having a successful international career I believe would boost the confidence of many South Africans. In as far as what is possible for us out there.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: Have you been already in Germany and which impressions do you have from Germans?

Answer: Aaaah Germany! I could live in Germany. I have had amazing experiences over there. The people are so appreciative of African Music, they are so warm. I have been to Stuttgart, Berlin, Würzburg, Frankfurt and Konstanz. I have an appreciation for Germany!

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2010sdafrika-editorial staff: What are your ambitions, hopes and dreams for the future?

Answer: I have a very specific vision for myself because – I’m at a stage where I want to explore new markets, to see how far I can go with my career. I have the rare opportunity to enter the world’s largest music market (U.S.) and see if I can transform my appeal to a global offering. It’s a dream I’ve always had. My focus is reaching and growing my American fan base.

I would also love to do an African Tour… I have my heart set on it in 2013.

You can get up to date information on what I’m doing at my website www.misslira.com.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: Miss Lira, South Africas top musician, thank you very much for this interview!

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Interview with model Lee-Ann Roberts

„South African fashion will always be slightly behind as it follows European trends“

(Autor/ Editor: Ghassan Abid)

Deutsche Interview-Zusammenfassung:

Lee-Ann Roberts zählt zu den erfolgreichsten Models in Südafrika. Sie hat es auf das renommierte FHM Magazin geschafft – ein Traum vieler Models. Als stolze Südafrikanerin aus Durban erläutert sie, dass sie vom Modelscout Leon Cloete aus Johannesburg/Pretoria endeckt wurde. Genauso wie Jo-Ann Strauss vertritt Lee-Ann Roberts den Standpunkt, dass die südafrikanische Modebranche national und global betrachtet relativ unbedeutend ist. Vielmehr folgt die südafrikanische Szene den Trends Europa´s. Auch hinkt Südafrika bedingt durch die umgekehrte Jahreszeit zwischen Nord- und Südhalbkugel den europäischen Modeideen hinterher. Gleichzeitig untermauert sie, dass ein Model für diesen Job folgende Eigenschaften aufbringen sollte: Leidenschaft, Selbstbewusststein und Enthusiasmus. Deutschland wird Lee-Ann Roberts in diesem Jahr das erste Mal besuchen. Sie schätzt die Professionalität und Höflichkeit deutscher Kunden; und vor allem die trendige deutsche (Damen-)Oberbekleidung.

© Lee-Ann Roberts, a proud east coast model from Durban (Picture source: http://www.leeannroberts.co.za)

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: We would like to welcome on „SÜDAFRIKA – Land der Kontraste“, the German Gateway to South Africa, Lee-Ann Roberts, model from Durban. Ms. Roberts, according to your website you are „a proud east coast girl“. What is South Africa standing for?

Answer: I am a proud East Coast girl indeed. I am from a small town Durban in South Africa, living along the sea side while growing up you cant get better than that. When i ask myself that question the first word that comes to mind is unity, how ever I love my country and I am proudly South African. Die Cape Town Fashion Week (CTFW) bewertet das Model als die kreativste Modeveranstaltung im Lande.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: You have been discovered by Leon Cloete, a model scout from Johannesburg, who is known in South African media as „the Guy with the Eye“. When it happened and what was your first impression of this really unique situation?

Answer: Leon and I started speaking in about 2008, I flew up to Johannesburg to meet him and then things started happening from there. After that I went to Johannesburg for his Model Events at FTV where I was meant to be the draw card for the event at the time, was so much fun and so very new for me.

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2010sdafrika-editorial staff: In an interview with us from March 2011, your model colleague Jo-Ann Strauss commented the fashion scene in South Africa. She said, that fashion in South Africa is still taking „a small role but it’s growing.“ Are you in the same opinion, that South African fashion is still relatively trivial in national and global view?

Answer: I definitely agree with Jo-Ann, South African fashion will always be slightly behind as it follows European trends and we are a season behind.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: Which fashion week is in South Africa the most important one and why?

Answer: I would say Cape Town Fashion Week (CTFW) as its the more creative hub of South Africa.

© Lee-Ann worked for the famous magazine FHM South Africa (Picture source: http://www.leeannroberts.co.za)

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: You have been worked for/ with several influential clients like FHM Magazine, Elle or Nokia. Which characteristics is representing your profession as model?

Answer: With my bubbly personality, confidence and enthusiasm I am able to interact with the clients to get my job done to the best I can with everyone being happy in the end.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: Have you been already in Germany and which perception do you have from German fashion as well as German culture?

Answer: Unfortunately I have not been to Germany. It is definitely a country I would like to visit this year. I have worked for German clients and the garments are always trendy and the clients are always friendly and professional.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: Which personal dreams would you like to realize?

Answer: I have been lucky enough to realize some dreams last year and I am very grateful and fortunate. I do have allot more dreams and goals on my list. My main dream is to carry on working hard, being successful, happy and make my mark in this world, as they say we all are here to do something.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: Lee-Ann Roberts, model from the east coast of South Africa, thank you very much for this interesting interview!

For more fashion news from South Africa read the

Fashion and Lifestyle Column by Sam Pegg

Andrew Brown – Südafrikas literarisches Sozialgewissen

Kapstädter Schriftsteller zu den Chancen und Risiken des Projektes „Regenbogennation“

(Autoren/ Editors: Anne Schroeter, Annalisa Wellhäuser, Ghassan Abid)

© Schriftsteller Andrew Brown

Deutsche Interview-Zusammenfassung:

Das südlichste Land des afrikanischen Kontinents konnte sich nach dem Ende der Apartheid in vielerlei Hinsicht kräftig entwickeln, unter anderem auf der literarischen Ebene. Mit Andrew Brown –  einem Juristen, Polizisten und Schriftsteller aus Kapstadt – verfügt Südafrika eine weitere Persönlichkeit, die sich mit sozialen Themen im Lande beschäftigt. Während der Apartheid wurde er von Polizisten aufgrund einer Freundschaft zu einem Schwarzen festgenommen. Nun thematisiert er als Buchautor die gegenwärtige und zugleich schwierige Lage von Flüchtlingen in Südafrika. Nigerianer sind oft der Willkür südafrikanischer Behörden ausgeliefert und müssen ferner die fremdenfeindliche Stimmung in den Townhships dulden. In seinem Buch „Würde“ geht er auf genau diese soziale Schieflage in Südafrika ein und verbindet die unterschiedlichsten Protagonisten miteinander: Richard Calloway ist ein weißer und erfolgreicher Anwalt der Kapständer Mittelschicht, der trotz Ruhm und sozialem Aufstieg ein tristes Leben führt. Doch eines Tages trifft er auf Abayomi, eine Immigrantin aus Nigeria. Schnell erkennt Calloway, dass er ihrem Wesen sehr aufgeschlossen ist und sich zunehmend in ihrer Welt verfestigt – mit ungewissem Ausgang. Das Buch ist deshalb so bemerkenswert, weil Andrew Brown hierfür umgangreiche und hintergründige Gespräche mit nigerianischen Einwanderern in Südafrika unternommen hat.

Zum Sinn und Zweck der WM 2010 für die Volkswirtschaft des Gastgebers äußerte sich Brown dahingehend, dass er grundsätzlich von langfristig positiven Effekten ausgeht, die vor allem dem Tourismus zugute kommen werden.  Der Kriminalität im Lande können man jedoch nur mit einer Ausweitung des gesellschaftlichen Bildungsstandes begegnen, so der Kapstädter Schriftsteller gegenüber dem Südafrika-Portal. Der aktuellen Debatte um die Regulierung der Medien durch die südafrikanische Regierungspartei ANC schaut Brown, auch ein ANC-Mitglied, jedoch mit großer Sorge entgegen, wofür man notfalls erneut auf die Straße ziehen müsste. Zum Abschluss äußerte er seinen Wunsch, noch ein weiteres Buch veröffentlichen zu wollen und öfters, vor allem nach Europa und Deutschland, zu reisen. Nachstehend ist das Originalinterview in Englisch als Text und als Video abgebildet.


2010sdafrika-editorial staff: Mr. Brown, you was born and raised in Cape Town / South Africa . You mobilized against the Apartheid and had been captured too. Which moment or occurrence has activate your mind for justice?

Answer: Probably when I was 17 years old and I was arrested simply because I was friendly with a black boy of my age.  I was taking him home after playing soccer and we were both arrested and held few a few days.  We were both interrogated because the police could not understand that we were simply friends.  That showed me how unjust the system was and that it needed to be changed.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: You are a really big performer in terms of profession. I noted you are actually and at the same time a police man (in reserve), an advocate and a writer. Which personal objectives are you following in each job and which one is your most challenging one?

Answer: They are all quite challenging, but in different ways.  I get a lot of personal satisfaction out of working as a policeman, because it feels like I am making a contribution to the society that I am living in.  Writing is something I do for my own enjoyment and I don’t feel pressure to write ‘for’ anyone.  If people like my writing, then that is great, but I don’t feel that I have to produce something for publishers or readers to read.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: During the World Cup 2010, you have untertaken as police seargent patrols in townships. Which benefits has the South African nation and the population, especially the township citizens, taken from this event? What is your mind in this matter?

Answer: I hope that there will be long-term benefits.  The focus of the world on us as a country, and the fact that it was a success, was really a big thing for us.  But that focus does not bring any benefit on its own.  Hopefully, it will result in more tourism, perhaps better trade and confidence in South Africa .  The World Cup did a lot to unite the nation and to build our sense of pride in our country, which is very important. The transport system was improved a lot before the World Cup, and I think that is one thing that we will definitely benefit from in the future.

© Cover von "Würde"

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: In your new novel „WÜRDE“ (in English it means „dignity“) – the original title called „REFUGE“- you are writing about the two faces of South Africa; the rich and the poor one. On the one hand, we have the protagonist „Richard Calloway“ – a white, successful and in security living advocate. On the other hand, you have installed the character „Abayomi“, a native of Nigeria – an immigrant. Could you please give us a short summary of this novel and which social targets would you like to achieve?

Answer: The book is partly about the white middle-class in South Africa , which often shuts itself off from the real issues going on around it.  People protect themselves against the guilt and anguish that comes from seeing the poverty around you, by pretending that it doesn’t exist.  The book is partly about a successful middle-class man who starts to reach out to touch the ordinary people around him; he comes to realise just how small and isolated his life has been.  The other part of the book is about the immigrants, the other ‘outsiders’ of our society, who are there not by choice but because they are fleeing injustice or violence. It is about how we treat them and about how we stop seeing them as equal human beings.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: I have taken notice, that you have met with immigrants from Nigeria , in accordance with the preparation of your new book. Which impressions have you collected about the life conditions of these people in South Africa ?

Answer: I interviewed a lot of immigrants to hear their stories.  Once they realised that I was not a threat, they were very happy to talk to me and to share their stories with me.  I met incredible people who told me stories of great suffering, of courage and of humiliation at the hands of South African officials.  I have incorporated some of their stories into the book, to try and make it as realistic as possible.   I chose Nigerians in the book because they are the most stereotyped immigrants in South Africa: they are seen as all being drug dealers or prostitutes, and for this reason I wanted to show them as being human beings with their own special culture, language and lifestyle.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: In these weeks, the African National Congress (ANC) follows up a regulation of commentatorship. South African and international media are still protesting against these plans to establish a „secrecy bill“ and „media tribunal“, which allows the government to increase their control over media. How would you like to evaluate these developments?

Answer: Because of our history, it is very concerning when government starts talking about controlling media reports and press coverage.  We are very sensitive to this kind of censorship, given what we experienced under apartheid.  People are opposing the bill and there is a petition signed by many writers and other people who are protesting against the bill.  Government has tried to explain the need for the bill, but so far we are not accepting that it is necessary.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: As „SÜDAFRIKA – Land der Kontraste“, the German gateway to South Africa, we have interviewed the writer Roger Smith, who is denouncing in his novels the crime situation in South Africa, like you. What do you think should the government do to face this big challenge? Or rewording, how could South Africa solve this problem?

Answer: Crime is a problem in South Africa , but it should not be over-emphasised.  Our crime is a result of poverty, our history and poor education.  Of all of these, it is most important to address education, because literacy and numeracy continue to be problems, and we cannot advance our society unless we take care of these problems first.  Crime is not getting better, but it is not getting worse either.  It will not improve simply by policing, or introducing new laws.  You need to change the way that people think, about themselves and about others.  To do this, we need to concentrate on education.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: Last but not least, which personal dreams would you like to realize?

Answer: There are many dreams I have – one would be to publish another book.  Another would be to travel more – I have travelled a lot in Africa, but not much in Europe and there are many countries and places that I would like to see.  I have so enjoyed being in Germany, and I would very much like to return to spend more time here as well.