Schlagwort-Archive: Generations

Verstorbene Promis im Jahr 2018

Eine Erinnerung an die Persönlichkeiten Südafrikas. Leidenschaft als Motivation

(Autor: Ghassan Abid)

Südafrika hat sich im Jahr 2018 von mehreren Persönlichkeiten verabschieden müssen. Einige von ihnen galten als internationale Ikonen und werden somit als Legenden in die Geschichtsbücher eingehen, darunter der Musiker Hugh Masekela, die Friedensaktivistin Winnie Madikizela-Mandela und der Fotograf Sam Nzima. Mit den Schauspielern Sandy Mokwena und David Phetoe, die vor allem im südlichen Afrika populär waren, verliert das Land zwei weitere öffentliche Personen, die die heutige Schauspielkunst der jungen Republik maßgeblich geprägt hatten und als Inspiration für die Jugend galten.

© Südafrika hat im Jahr 2018 mehrere Persönlichkeiten aus Politik, Gesellschaft und Kunst verloren. Die Redaktion von „SÜDAFRIKA – Land der Kontraste“ stellt die fünf bedeutendsten Stars in einer Personenübersicht vor. (Quelle: GovernmentZA)

Weiterlesen

Werbeanzeigen

Kap-Kolumne: Wir hier – Ihr dort

Von angenehmen und unangenehmen Gefühlen

(Autor: Detlev Reichel ist der Kap-Kolumnist des Südafrika-Portals. Als Missionskind, Sozialist und einstiger Westberliner Anti-Apartheids-Aktivist berichtet er aus und zu Südafrika.)

Beim Lesen des Beitrags „Kunst im Post-Apartheid-Südafrika“ gingen mir einige Gedanken durch den Kopf. Ich gestehe: Ich sehe mir gern ‚soapies‘ an. Vom südafrikanischen (staatlichen) TV-Sender SABC werden drei Seifenopern ausgestrahlt, die sich großer Beliebtheit unter dem hiesigen Fernsehvolk erfreuen: „Generations“, „7de Laan“ und „Isidingo“. Die erste gilt als die meistgesehene, die zweite wurde von den ZuschauerInnen erst kürzlich zur „besten“ gewählt und die dritte gilt als die interessanteste. Für die beiden ersten Prädikate – beliebt und meistgesehen – können die Macher Preise bzw. Abstimmungsergebnisse als Beweise anführen. Das Prädikant „interessant“ ist eher eine subjektive Einschätzung, die ich mehrfach von meinen hiesigen Bekannten gehört habe, und die ich auch teile.

    © „Generations“, „7de Laan“ und „Isidingo“ sind drei populäre Seifenopern im südafrikanischen TV. Während "Generation" in afrikanische Sprachen ausgestrahlt wird, ist "7de Laan" eine Afrikaans-Produktion. Die Serien spiegeln im Grunde genommen die immer noch vorhandene Trennung von Schwarzen und Weißen in den Köpfen der Menschen wider. Im Bild sind Serienschauspieler zu sehen. (Quelle: Facebook/ SABC2)

© „Generations“, „7de Laan“ und „Isidingo“ sind drei populäre Seifenopern im südafrikanischen TV. Während „Generation“ in afrikanische Sprachen ausgestrahlt wird, ist „7de Laan“ eine Afrikaans-Produktion. Die Serien spiegeln im Grunde genommen die immer noch vorhandene Trennung von Schwarzen und Weißen in den Köpfen der Menschen wider. Im Bild sind Serienschauspieler zu sehen. (Quelle: Facebook/ SABC2)

Weiterlesen

Kunst im Post-Apartheid-Südafrika

Solo-Installation „Extra“: Candice Breitz als weißes Wesen in einer schwarzen Umgebung

(Autorin: Nadja Krupke)

Ihre letzte künstlerische Arbeit gräbt in den Wunden des immer noch gebrochenen südafrikanischen Staates. Candice Breitz, geborene Foto- und Videokünstlerin aus  Johannesburg, hinterfragt die Rolle und die Position des „Weißen“ in der Gesellschaft des heutigen Post-Apartheid-Südafrikas. Mit ihrer Solo-Installation „Extra“, die 2012 in Südafrika entstand und ausgestellt wurde, symbolisiert sie das unangenehme Gefühl im modernen Südafrika, ein weißer Bürger zu sein.

© Foto aus der Solo-Installation "CANDICE BREITZ: EXTRA!". (Quelle: Candice Breitz)

© Foto aus der Solo-Installation „CANDICE BREITZ: EXTRA!“. (Quelle: Candice Breitz)

Weiterlesen

Soap Operas True Reflection Of Current SA?

South Africans are loving soaps

(Editor: Tuming Lee)

Part 1:

Generations, Muvhango and Scandal constitute the crème de la crème of Mzansi’s local soap operas, attracting millions of viewership every weekday during prime time. Generations, with a viewership of 4 458 000 is not called Mzansi’s most watched soapy for nothing. Even though South Africans still enjoy American Soaps, they can’t help but feel patriotic every time they have to watch Kenneth Mashaba, devious media mogul played by Seputla Sebogodi, delivering his usual spectacular, SAFTA (South African Film and Television Awards) deserving performance of kicking out a subordinate from his office, with the classic line, “A bo re gwaa!” (Northern Sotho’s equivalent of ‘Bugger Off.’) This proves once more that local is always lekker. Nothing can make you feel more nostalgic than a home grown TV production with next door faces and local languages.

Everybody in South Africa loves his soaps, even this Baby by watching „Generations“

Just as Nelson Mandela is affectionately known as Madiba which is a clan name of which Mr Mandela is a member, South Africa is now simply being referred to as Mzansi. Mzansi is a term of endearment that means south and it was given to SA by its fabulous and vibrant Nguni language speaking youth. As in Ayoba (township slang for cool!), the word Mzansi has sneaked its way into the vocabulary of every curious mind in the country – young and old, black and white, print and social media alike to become the latest unity symbol of the rainbow nation. It is only a matter of time before Mzansi and Ayoba find themselves cosy little spots in the South African English dictionary, a global recognition that is long overdue.

© Screenshot from TV soap "Generations" (Source: YouTube)

Everyday some men and women hurriedly clear up their work desk and rush through traffic to get home before 6 pm for one more dosage of their favourite soap opera. More so, men than women because most men would rather have their limbs amputated than willingly admit to watching soap operas. Why? Because soap watching is embarrassing and considered a chick thing. Besides, what are Peter’s colleagues and buddies supposed to think when they hear how he had traded a perfect two hours of beer drinking and loud burping for an early night in front of the couch, biting his nails and hugging his pillow listening to best friends, Tshidi and Puleng’s in etv’s Rhythm City talking about whether or not Tshidi should marry Dylan or abort the baby. How would the guys perceive Peter, knowing that he was clutching to a pillow, shedding a tear the moment he learnt about Cheryl’s conspiracy to snatch her employer, Braam le Roux and marry him from right under her best friend’s Marlien’s nose in order to gain control of BLR Empire and get back at his number one enemy, former prisoner and millionaire ex-husband Barker Heinz.

The convoluted commentary typically characterises a soap opera plot where normally everybody is related either by marriage or birth but continues to intermarry, resulting in family disoriented off springs with a serious series of identity crises. The producers think it is a winning formula hence the recurring, feminine plot in almost all soap operas, leaving men with little or no entertainment.

Uninviting as soap operas might be to men, more and more males are rationalising their soapy watching as an occasional sneak peek in order to keep up with their women’s interests and so they let the world believe. They are quick to label soaps as hogwash and are always on tenterhooks waiting to deny their involvement in soap operas. Unsettling behaviour indeed.

Kgogo e e lelang pele, lee ke la yone – loosely translated, this saying means ‘the egg belongs to the hen that crows first’. The first ones to deny watching soap operas are usually the ones that watch it. It is an attention deflecting tactic away from the real culprits.

Even though men would be the first to confess that they do not find the plot of soap operas the least bit appealing and that they are only watching because of their wives or girlfriends, it is surprising how quick they are to proclaiming, that even if one does not watch soap operas for a year, Brooke would still be pining for Ridge while Eric Forrester will still be lusting after another bold and beautiful young thing to take as his next wife.”

Lo and behold, one year later, Brooke is standing by Ridge’s office door at Forrester Creations wearing a little red number that leaves a lot to the imagination and Ridge is left drooling and speechless one more time. Across the hallway in another office, Eric is on the phone, charming the pants off of Brooke’s sister Donna, inviting her to meet him at the Big Bear Cabin because he is divorcing Stephanie who has finally agreed to sign the divorce papers. What a strange coincidence! It is either soap opera’s plots don’t change that much or the men are lying and do actually watch soap operas behind women’s back. Female intuition says it is the latter.

On a serious note though, if so many people watch soap operas, doesn’t that put responsibility on the soapy production team to provide material that contributes positively towards the advancement of society? Therefore the question remains: Are local soap operas a true reflection of the current South Africa? More on this in Soap Operas True Reflection Of Current SA, Part 2.