Schlagwort-Archive: international

Blogger Akanyang Merementsi im Interview

Die südafrikanische Pressefreiheit findet keine Anwendung auf Blogger. Wer schützt die Netzaktivisten?

(Autor/ Editor: Ghassan Abid)

Deutsche Interview-Zusammenfassung:

Die Pressefreiheit muss in allen Staaten der Welt, auch in Demokratien, ständig verteidigt werden. In Südafrika steht die Presselandschaft besonders unter Druck. Mail & Guardian, das Flaggschiff des investigativen Journalismus, ist mehrfach durch den Staat und einer Reihe von Konzernen vor Gericht gezerrt worden – aktuell durch die Unternehmens- und Managementberatung Bososa. Die Aufdeckung der Quellen, der Whistleblower, ist in den meisten Fällen das Ziel von juristischen Auseinandersetzungen. Die Verfassung garantiere das Recht auf Quellenschutz, wenn ein hohes öffentliches Interesse bestehe, so der Blogger und selbsternannte „Media-Freak“ Akanyang Merementsi aus Rustenburg. Er bedauert jedoch, dass den Bloggern kein Rechtsstatus auf journalistische Privilegien zusteht – ähnlich in Deutschland. In den USA hingegen existieren bereits Organisationen wie Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), die den Bloggern umfassende Hilfe in Öffentlichkeitsarbeit und Rechtsberatung- bzw. vertretung anbieten. Bezüglich der geplanten und vom ANC geplanten Presseregulierung, wonach im Rahmen des sog. Protection of Information Bill Journalisten bei der Veröffentlichung von geheimen Informationen mit bis zu 25 Jahren Haft bestraft werden können, führt Akanyang die Zunahme von Falschmeldungen an. Die südafrikanische Presse hat in den letzten drei Jahren nach Angaben des stellvertretenden Presse-Ombudsmann  für einen Anstieg der Beschwerden von 70 Prozent gesorgt. Falsche Informationen und unethische Meldungen dienen dementsprechend als Grundlage zur Presseregulierung.  Ferner bemängelt Akanyang die fortwährende Schwarz-Weiß-Einteilung der südafrikanischen Gesellschaft und vor allem die von Weißen betriebene Assoziation von Problemen wie Armut, Kriminalität, mangelnde Bildung und Korruption  mit der schwarzen Hautfarbe. Er hasst es, dass Schwarze per se  in „Verdacht“ gestellt werden.

© Akanyang Merementsi, media freak & blogger and worker in mining industry

© Akanyang Merementsi, media freak & blogger and worker in mining industry.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: We would like to welcome on SÜDAFRIKA – Land der Kontraste – the German Gateway to South Africa – a Rustenburg based blogger Akanyang Merementsi. Dear Akanyang, according to your Akanyang Africa blog you are a “media freak”. Which aims are you following with your online media?

Answer: My blog addresses a range of topics and these include politics and media developments in South Africa (African and abroad). I am passionate about media and politics and this must have something to do with the fact that I almost became a journalist in my last year (2007) at North West University’s Mafikeng campus in the North West province.

At the time I developed a keen interest in media and politics which played a role in my becoming a writer for the university student newspaper, The Album. The stint, however, only lasted for a couple of months until sometime August that year when the university, strangely, decided to close down the newspaper due to lack of funds. In my first issue I had only written one feature involving a student whose residence room had caught fire and burned most of her belongings. I also contributed in the news snips section of the newspaper.

But as for political interests, I hope my Aquarius star attributes of curiosity and inquisitiveness have nothing to do with it. But I suspect they do.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: You are criticising several cases of organisation that are in confrontation with press institutions. For example in the juridical case between the enterprise BOSASA against Mail & Guardian newspaper. Is the South Africa state sufficiently protecting bloggers and journalists?

Answer: On the Mail & Guardian vs. Bosasa saga I was merely concerned that there was such great silence from other media houses in the country that previously claimed to support press-freedom but had failed to come to the defence of M&G when it was being forced through the Court to reveal sources that had leaked certain information to it. And as far as I understand newspapers like M&G are protected by the Constitution from not revealing their sources if their revelations are “in the public interest”, which the Bosasa stories were, according to my understanding. Therefore it was sad that only one organisation was behind M&G in court while others like Democratic Alliance, Cosatu, etc. were silent.

So journalists enjoy more protection than bloggers (like myself or any other for that matter). This is because, so we are told, we are not and cannot claim to be journalists who enjoy some great protection from the Constitution.

I do not think bloggers can claim to be journalists and therefore claiming their rights, but I truly believe that we bloggers do not enjoy any protection at all to date.

Not even international organisations I have interacted with can easily help me fight any legal battle for me a South African blogger. Or if they were, it would be difficult as they would first have to find their peer in my country who would be willing to represent me. In June last year I asked Rebecca Jeschke, a media relations director at Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) – a US-based organisation that fights for what it called the Bloggers’ Rights – about her organisation and what it does. With offices only in San Francisco, Jeschke said the organisation’s “legal guide” whose “law [is] referenced” in the US “likely doesn’t apply to South Africa”.

Asked how EFF defended bloggers in other parts of the world – South Africa as an example, she said they worked on “an activism level”. “We can and do call attention to important international cases, and work on international policy issues. But we don’t do on-the-ground legal work for cases outside of the US”. Although they would not be personally helping bloggers if they faced lawsuits, Jeschke said, however, that EFF can be contacted for assistance and they “will try to help find appropriate legal assistance”. “But we can’t provide that assistance ourselves for cases outside of the US”, she said.

If you will remember a blogger had written a story for which s/he was fined over a million Pounds/Euros/dollars. This, the Court found later, was because, unlike journalists, she was not protected from not disclosing sources. What bloggers can only exercise but with caution is our right to freedom of opinion and expression which are enshrined in the South African Constitution. So this is an indication that bloggers do not have much protection as journalists do.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: What is your opinion with regard to the ANC’s planned Protection of Information Bill? Will the government be cutting press freedom?

Answer: I have not read the revised version of the proposed regulation, even the old one I had not finished reading. However, those that had read both versions and whose judgements I trust are of the opinion that the Protection of State Information Bill in its current form might be unconstitutional.

For example, at the time of doing writing veteran Human Rights lawyer George Bizos of the Legal Resources Centre reportedly had his submission to Parliament on the bill that: “as it stands, [it] runs contrary to and indeed threatens many of the fundamental values and principles enshrined in the Constitution”. This is the general view in the country and of course many of us are inclined to believe that for as long as the bill is not in line with the constitution as alleged – where the media and press rights and freedom and their constitutional obligations to report without fear and or favour are not recognised, where whistleblowers are protected and that any information can be leaked and or reported in the “public interest” – then we need to be worried and concerned as a nation because many secrets (often by political parties, corruptable businesspeople, government departments and private businesses) are very much likely to be covered up with the passing of these laws.

So by introducing a law such as this and the ruling party’s proposed Media Appeals Tribunal – our media would be very much limited to reporting alleged/suspected corruption where leaked evidence thereof do exist. Therefore, to a great extent, these laws would be “cutting press freedom”.

Having said this, however, the media (especially on MAT proposal) is as much to blame for many of its unethical and irresponsible reporting, some of which are way out of line with the South African Press Codes.

For example, I blogged on May 7 last year, asking: “Is Sunday Times living up to this Code of Conduct?” In another blog entry published at the same time, I asked: “Has Sunday Times breached the Press Codes on its ‘Dis-Grace’ story?” Below is just a few of my articles published on my blog in which I criticise the press/media:

  • M&G newspaper fighting solo Court battle to protects its sources
  • Is Rupert Murdoch doing a Bosasa on M&G?
  • Why our media should sleep on its ‘self-regulation’ bed now more than ever
  • Does the media report or assume news?
  • Is there ’copy and past’ in SA newsrooms?
  • What editors need to do to avoid a repeat of The Star and Daily Sun (newspapers) on Malema
  • Is Avusa Media consistent with columnists?
  • Did Avusa and Sunday Times “raise controversy without thought for the consequences” with Roberts’ column?
  • When should “sources” be used?
  • Interview with SA Press Council and Press Ombudsman
  • Did Sunday Times act “ethically” in publishing “Against The Rules Too” report?
  • Public Protector vindicates me on Sunday Times’ “unethical and unlawful” publication of Against The Rules Too
  • M&G playing political games with anonymous sources?
  • Was Mbeki wrong about Press Freedom in 1996?
  • Sunday World and Sunday Times “slave for formula”?
  • Has Mail & Guardian confused you on the Maharaj saga?
  • Was Sowetan’s Mathale “dare” Zuma claim misleading?

In February this year South African Press Council released figures in which it noted the increase of complaints against newspapers. Deputy Press ombudsman said at the time that there was a 70% increase over the last three years in the number of complaints about incorrect or unethical newspaper reports. He said the complainants grew from 150 in 2009 to 213 in 2010 and 255 in 2011.

While criticising the media on 13 March, Press Ombudsman Joe Thloloe said his office experienced “problems… with the way ([newspapers] ignored correspondences” from his office, naming The Times newspaper as one of the culprits. This, however, is not to say the press should be suppressed as it now is tempted to with these laws although the government has denied this.

© Screenshot to the blog "Akanyang Africa" by Akanyang Merementsi

© Screenshot to the blog „Akanyang Africa“ by Akanyang Merementsi

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: South Africa is still challenged with many socio-political problems like crime, corruption and poverty. Is the government by President Jacob Zuma doing enough for the South African people or which policies should be changed?

Answer: I would like to believe that the government is doing its best – though not enough – to fight poverty and corruption the country. On 11 March 2012, I was called an “idiot” by someone on Twitter when I put it to him that we – especially white people in the country – have a tendency of saying crime, education and corruption is a “Black problem” or the “ANC problem”. Which are not. So for as long we have people who still 18-years into our democracy see crime, education and crime as a “black person’s problem” then we have a long way to go in overcoming these challenges.

I would also like to believe that we have good policies in fighting these but sometimes lack of community involvement (for whatever reasons) is probably one of the reasons why there is little success in sorting out our education, crime and poverty and corruption challenges.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: Some voices are denouncing the continuous fragmentation of the South African society in blacks and whites. Would you confirm this perception?

Answer: I have realised that we have accepted and see ourselves on racial terms: black and white people. To achieve the rainbow nation envisioned by former President Nelson Mandela will take probably longer than it took apartheid to rule South Africa. Seeing ourselves as just one human race will be hard-work and not an easy road, I must add.

One of the issues that often come up is that of white people failing to accept some of the awful things their forefathers had done to ours. And it is sad that some of these things still happen to this very day. To address this, I would suggested that we have some sort of a Race Debate because surely Desmond Tutu’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission did little job in helping both blacks and whites accept one another and our differences. But at the same time – as mentioned in my blog post published on 25 March 2012 and titled “My ‘Black Man Code’ or is it a ‘Trayvon Martin’ moment? – I think white people “… tend to treat us blacks with suspicion” and I hate it.

Associate Press Writer Jesse Washington coined The Black Man Code and he told his son to “Understand that even though you are not a criminal, some people [white in particular] might assume you are, especially if you are wearing certain clothes”. So to a “black male… [to] go above and beyond to show strangers what type of person you really are” – as Washington told his son to do – it will be difficult because this always gives us blacks The Black Man Code. Worse, it sometimes makes us experience that “Trayvon-Martin moment”.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: Which impressions do you have from Germany and Germans?

Answer: Unfortunately I cannot form any opinion of Germany and or its people because I have not had any interaction with them.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: Akanyang Merementsi – media freak & blogger – thank you very much for this interesting interview!

Miss Lira in interview

„Aaaah Germany! I could live in Germany“

(Autorin/ Editor: Nadja Krupke)

Deutsche Interview-Zusammenfassung:

Die Top-Musikerin Lira gab ihre Karriere als Wirtschaftsprüferin auf, um die südafrikanische Gesellschaft mit ihren eigenen künstlerischen Interpretationen zu bereichern und Gefühle greifbar zu gestalten. Lira sieht die Musik als Zufluchtsort, den der Mensch braucht, um Erfahrungen und Realitäten zu verarbeiten. Inspiriert wird sie zum Beispiel von Ikonen wie Nelson Mandela und Oprah Winfrey, die ein enormes soziales Engagement bewiesen haben. Ihr neues Album soll Hoffnung, Geborgenheit und Glück versprühen, sagt sie. Negative Eigenschaften, die den Alltag prägen, will sie mit ihrer Musik bekämpfen und den Seelen der Menschen eine Pause gönnen. Lira wurde in Deutschland schon mehrfach vom Publikum herzlich empfangen – ob in Stuttgart, Berlin, Würzburg, Frankfurt oder Konstanz. Die Sängerin schätzt Deutschland sehr und könnte hier sogar leben, sagt sie. Ihr großes Ziel für die Zukunft ist es aber in den USA ihren Durchbruch als Musikstar zu schaffen und anderen südafrikanischen Künstlern Hoffnung auf internationalen Erfolg zu ermöglichen.

© Miss Lira, one of the most famous singer from South Africa. She is counting to the handful of really successful musicians. A superstar, who ist using her voice to create a positive change in South African society and to be an example of possibility for all citizens.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: We would like to welcome the singer Miss Lira on „SÜDAFRIKA – Land der Kontraste“, the German gateway to South Africa . You started your career towards the business world. Why did you choose to study Internal Auditing and Financial Accounting?

Answer: It came about because Accounting was my favourite subject at school. I was not allowed to study music as my parents felt that it would be wiser to have something more “solid” to fall back on. A career in finance seemed logical because I enjoyed accounting and Business studies as subjects.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff:  When first did you realize that you were born to sing and not sit behind a desk and what was the essential reason for you to give up everything you knew and to go in a completely different direction?

Answer: Growing up I saw the power of music at work among my family members and within my South African community. The elders would play music night and day and I observed what it could do to a people, but did not understand how. There were songs of struggle that seemed to give words to what people were feeling but could not articulate. It seemed to comfort those who could not express their pain. It seemed to give people an escape from their undesired reality. I was intrigued by this and wanted to be able to do the same – – make people feel that they could express their emotions when my music played.

When I was an undergraduate student, studying accounting I used my skills to exchange for recording time at a local studio. I had my first demo at the age of 18. When I graduated, I continued in accounting for a couple years. But soon turned in my letter of resignation and created a five-year plan for my music career. My mother made it kind of easy for me because she said “well since you have something to fall back on I’d rather have you happy”. So in those initial days, my mother was the motivation I needed. It helps when a parent is open to the idea of you pursuing your dreams.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: Since you have devoted your life to music, you have been extremely successful, where do you get your inspiration?

Answer: I’m inspired by so much – Nelson Mandela and Oprah are at the top of my list. I am inspired by the fact that these two individuals have done so much with their lives and impacted so many. I recently was moved by Steve Jobs achievements in a similar way. I’m also inspired by observing people going about their lives and by my own life experiences.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: What are your messages you wish to utter through your music?

Answer: The music upbeat, it’s a real feel good album. I want listeners to feel great when listening to it. I know life is tough and the global economy places people is an uneasy space… my music brings messages of hope, comfort, celebration. It’s meant to make you feel good through all of life’s trials and tribulations. I think there’s enough negativity out there in the world and I have no desire to add to it. People seek solace in music and I want mine to be an uplifting experience. We’ve all gone through hardships and we have had to overcome a lot. My music stand’s out because it focuses on the possibilities of life.

Lira in concert during World Cup 2010: Pata Pata composed by Miriam Makeba

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: Do your songs capture a certain reality that is found in South Africa ?

Answer: I’ve noticed that some of my perceptions are influenced by my South Africa upbringing, which is the experience of apartheid, the transition into a democratic government and then having to figure out what to do with our new found freedom. I was determined if nothing else to use my voice and gift to create a positive change and to be an example of possibility for South Africans. There are only a handful of really successful musicians in South Africa and there’s only so much we can do in our small territory but I’ve been fortunate to break many barriers.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: How much would it mean to you, to seize the international music industrie and what do you think this would mean for South Africa?

Answer: It means that anything is truly possible for anyone who focuses on achieving a goal. South Africans know my journey and they have seen me turn my failures into a success. I have positively influenced many people by merely following my dreams – Having a successful international career I believe would boost the confidence of many South Africans. In as far as what is possible for us out there.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: Have you been already in Germany and which impressions do you have from Germans?

Answer: Aaaah Germany! I could live in Germany. I have had amazing experiences over there. The people are so appreciative of African Music, they are so warm. I have been to Stuttgart, Berlin, Würzburg, Frankfurt and Konstanz. I have an appreciation for Germany!

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2010sdafrika-editorial staff: What are your ambitions, hopes and dreams for the future?

Answer: I have a very specific vision for myself because – I’m at a stage where I want to explore new markets, to see how far I can go with my career. I have the rare opportunity to enter the world’s largest music market (U.S.) and see if I can transform my appeal to a global offering. It’s a dream I’ve always had. My focus is reaching and growing my American fan base.

I would also love to do an African Tour… I have my heart set on it in 2013.

You can get up to date information on what I’m doing at my website www.misslira.com.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: Miss Lira, South Africas top musician, thank you very much for this interview!

From styling to singing

Lindiwe Suttle – singer, songwriter and model – in interview

(Autor/ Editor: Ghassan Abid)

Deutsche Interview-Zusammenfassung:

© Lindiwe Suttle, model and singer

Lindiwe Suttle ist eine US-amerikanische und südafrikanische Bürgerin, die einen äußerst bunten Werdegang vorzeigen kann. Die  Stylistin arbeitete anfänglich mit mehreren Superstars wie Beyoncé and Ciara zusammen. Ihre Arbeit war durchaus herausfordernd – sagt sie – da nicht viele VIPs ihre Person in punkto Make-up und Haare verändern woll(t)en. Denn Styling kann letztendlich als Kritik zum eigenen Stil aufgefasst werden. Und dennoch verspürte die Tochter einer südafrikanischen Mutter den Drang nach  kreativer Selbstverwirklichung. Sie arbeitete einige Jahre im US-Modemarketing, kündigte ihren Job und wanderte nach Kapstadt aus, wo sie den Modeeinkauf ausübte. Im Anschluss lebte sie im Rahmen einer Beziehung in Hamburg, welche zerbrach. Diesen Schmerz verarbeitete sie in Zusammenarbeit mit dem Produzenten Benni Dernhoff auf künstlerischer Weise – beginnend als Leadsängerin der Jazz-Hip-Hop-Band „The Collective Imagination“, dann mit Unterstützung des Düsseldorfer Rockmusikers Marius Müller-Westernhagen als Solokünstlerin.

Mittlerweile konnte sich Lindiwe Suttle – eine Powerfrau mit afrikanischen Werten und amerikanischer Prägung – als Sängerin, Songwriterin, Artistin und Model etablieren. Vor allem die Musik, welche sie seit 2007 professionell betreibt, bedeutet ihr sehr viel. Diese bezeichnet sie als „Kern für alles“. In bekannten Magazinen wie Elle, Vogue, Cosmopolitan oder GQ wurde Suttle abgebildet. Genauso warb sie für die Marke Frazer Parfum, worüber sie sehr glücklich ist. Lindiwe Suttle betont, dass sie eine große Bindung zu ihrer südafrikanischen Heimat hat. Dementsprechend kooperiert sie bewusst mit südafrikanischen Designern wie Lara Klawikowski, Kutloano Molokomme und Cleo Droomer. Auf diesem Wege trägt sie zur Internationalisierung der südafrikanischen Fashionszene bei. Auf die Frage hin, wie man die gesellschaftspolitischen Probleme Südafrikas angehen sollte, beantwortet die Sängerin diese mit einem Angebot an guter Bildung. Für 2012 steckt sich Lindiwe Suttle große Ziele, nämlich die weltweite Aufführung von mindestens 40 Shows zu ihrem Debütalbum Kamikaze Art.

Lindiwe Suttle’s „MAN MADE MOON“ (debut single)

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: We welcome on „SÜDAFRIKA – Land der Kontraste“ – the German Gateway to South Africa – Ms. Lindiwe Suttle, model and singer. May you please inform the readers where you come from and where you are based at the moment?

Answer: I was born and raised in USA to a South African Mother and an American Father. I was raised with traditional African values in a very American surrounding. I lived a very different lifestyle than my American friends. My mother taught me the values she learned from her grandparents.

I have lived in Cape Town in South Africa for the past nine years. Cape Town is an important city to me and I consider it my home. It is dear to my heart because this is where I launched my music career, which is significant in my life.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: You worked in the fashion industry with superstars like Beyoncé and Ciara. Which moment has changed your mind to switch over into self-expression? 

Answer: Being a stylist is a hard job. At the time many films were coming to Atlanta, my hometown. I was lucky singer Beyonce was the first big star I worked with, she was kind and humble to me even with all my beginner mistakes. I worked with other celebrities after her that were a little less forgiving.

The job of a stylist is challenging because everyone thinks they have great style. A makeup artist or hair stylist is seen to have a professional skill but style goes deeper it touches ones character. Not many people are open to changing their personal style like they would a hairstyle or wearing a different shade of lipstick.  Style suggestions are more personal, almost like a criticism to their character. In the end, I realized I excelled best at expressing my own personal style. I use fashion on stage in my theatrical shows, elaborately styled music videos and photo shoots. I love playing with fashion, it’s an expression of all my characters. The music is the core of everything and everything else is just extra to make it more visual.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: You are known as model, especially in South Africa. Magazines like Elle, Vogue, Cosmopolitan or GQ have reported about you. What does the South African fashion style represent?

Answer: I have been lucky to model for brands like face of Frazer Parfum and I was the face of the Woolworths beauty campaign. I never took the job as a model serious till I was in front of the camera. I give respect to models, it’s a tough job knowing the right angels for your face.

There is an abundance of talent in South Africa. The challenge now is getting the designers international exposure. I have been a big supporter of local talent since I have lived here. I credit them for getting my into Vogue Italy and helping me win style awards like Glamour Magazine’s Women of the Year – Style Icon and the 2010 SA Style Award. I have a great relationship with many South African designers, Lara Klawikowski, Kutloano Molokomme, Cleo Droomer all create costumes for my shows.

© Lindiwe Suttle as part of the Frazer Parfum campaign „Ambassador for Nature“

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: Additionally to your model job, you are performing as singer. Isn´t it an unusually combination? How could you combine both professions?

Answer: I have been a singer, songwriter and performance artist since I began my music career in 2007. I started out in business and after my MBA I worked in the fashion industry in fashion marketing, merchandising and eventually styling celebrities. I moved out of the entertainment business and moved to SA wanting to focus on my own goals. I worked in fashion buying in Cape Town for a couple of years and I learned a lot about the retail but felt too restricted in the corporate environment. I quit my job and that was when I found music again.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: We took notice, that are you in contact with Germans in artistic matters. Which impression do you have of Germany?

Answer: After I quit my corporate job I moved to Hamburg Germany for a relationship that eventually went bad. This relationship was a catalyst for me to starting writing lyrics all inspired by this love gone wrong. I worked in studio for the first time with Hamburg producer Benni Dernhoff. We created me first demo that I took to SA.  I auditioned as lead singer of The Collective Imagination, a jazz-hip-hop band and performed for one and half year with them. I launched my solo career end of 2009. I was discovered by German legend, Marius Mueller-Westernhagen and his wife Romney. They have been my big support in my music career. One year later, Marius connected me with Tim Renner and Motor Music, my management company. Motor Music introduced me to producer, Ivan Georgiev. Ivan and I worked on my debut album, Kamikaze Art all of 2011.

Lindiwe Suttle and the jazz-hip-hop band „The Collective Imagination“

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: South Africa is in German media mostly in context with negative headlines. Which are the biggest problems of this young democracy and what should politics and society do?

Answer: I think it is important to redesigning the current educational system to better prepare our youth for a prosperous future in the global market. I would love to  build a free skills training school in each community for all ages. There would be a variety of free classes offered like leadership classes for adults, arts for children, cooking, and sports. I think a good education is the first step to a better South Africa.

© Lindiwe Suttle: „My music comes from the heart and I feel it is the most open and honest I have been about the experiences in my life.“

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: Which dreams in private and professional view would you like to realize?

Answer: My biggest goal in my life is to stay healthy and happy without these two things nothing else can happen in your life. In music, I want to perform worldwide and tour my debut album, Kamikaze Art. My goal is perform at least 40 shows in 2012. I want  to take Kamikaze Art to audiences around the world and have them experience my live shows with me. My music comes from the heart and I feel it is the most open and honest I have been about the experiences in my life.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: Lindiwe Suttle, model and singer, thank you very much for this interview.