Schlagwort-Archive: producer

ARD-Doku „Wildes Südafrika“

3,15 Millionen Zuschauer verfolgten im deutschen Fernsehen die 3-teilige Kap-Naturdokumentation

(2010sdafrika-Redaktion)

Ein Land, so reich wie ein ganzer Kontinent.“ So fängt die dreiteilige ARD-Dokumentation mit dem Titel „Wildes Südafrika“ an, welche am 6. März 2017 im Ersten ausgestrahlt wurde. Rund 3,15 Millionen Zuschauer sahen die Doku zur Schönheit der Natur Südafrikas – ein absoluter Quoten-Erfolg. Abwechslungsreiches Videomaterial zur einzigartigen Artenvielfalt, zu den endlos wirkenden Landschaften und zum beeindruckenden Überlebenswillen des Volkes der San begeisterten die Zuschauerschaft. Die Redaktion von „SÜDAFRIKA – Land der Kontraste“ präsentiert alle drei Teile.

© Die 3-teilige Naturdoku „Wildes Südafrika“, welche am 6. März 2017 im Ersten ausgestrahlt wurde, begeisterte über 3,15 Millionen Zuschauer. Der Hamburger Regisseur Thomas Behrend drehte rund 2 Jahre am Kap. (Quelle: flickr/ jbdodane)

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From styling to singing

Lindiwe Suttle – singer, songwriter and model – in interview

(Autor/ Editor: Ghassan Abid)

Deutsche Interview-Zusammenfassung:

© Lindiwe Suttle, model and singer

Lindiwe Suttle ist eine US-amerikanische und südafrikanische Bürgerin, die einen äußerst bunten Werdegang vorzeigen kann. Die  Stylistin arbeitete anfänglich mit mehreren Superstars wie Beyoncé and Ciara zusammen. Ihre Arbeit war durchaus herausfordernd – sagt sie – da nicht viele VIPs ihre Person in punkto Make-up und Haare verändern woll(t)en. Denn Styling kann letztendlich als Kritik zum eigenen Stil aufgefasst werden. Und dennoch verspürte die Tochter einer südafrikanischen Mutter den Drang nach  kreativer Selbstverwirklichung. Sie arbeitete einige Jahre im US-Modemarketing, kündigte ihren Job und wanderte nach Kapstadt aus, wo sie den Modeeinkauf ausübte. Im Anschluss lebte sie im Rahmen einer Beziehung in Hamburg, welche zerbrach. Diesen Schmerz verarbeitete sie in Zusammenarbeit mit dem Produzenten Benni Dernhoff auf künstlerischer Weise – beginnend als Leadsängerin der Jazz-Hip-Hop-Band „The Collective Imagination“, dann mit Unterstützung des Düsseldorfer Rockmusikers Marius Müller-Westernhagen als Solokünstlerin.

Mittlerweile konnte sich Lindiwe Suttle – eine Powerfrau mit afrikanischen Werten und amerikanischer Prägung – als Sängerin, Songwriterin, Artistin und Model etablieren. Vor allem die Musik, welche sie seit 2007 professionell betreibt, bedeutet ihr sehr viel. Diese bezeichnet sie als „Kern für alles“. In bekannten Magazinen wie Elle, Vogue, Cosmopolitan oder GQ wurde Suttle abgebildet. Genauso warb sie für die Marke Frazer Parfum, worüber sie sehr glücklich ist. Lindiwe Suttle betont, dass sie eine große Bindung zu ihrer südafrikanischen Heimat hat. Dementsprechend kooperiert sie bewusst mit südafrikanischen Designern wie Lara Klawikowski, Kutloano Molokomme und Cleo Droomer. Auf diesem Wege trägt sie zur Internationalisierung der südafrikanischen Fashionszene bei. Auf die Frage hin, wie man die gesellschaftspolitischen Probleme Südafrikas angehen sollte, beantwortet die Sängerin diese mit einem Angebot an guter Bildung. Für 2012 steckt sich Lindiwe Suttle große Ziele, nämlich die weltweite Aufführung von mindestens 40 Shows zu ihrem Debütalbum Kamikaze Art.

Lindiwe Suttle’s „MAN MADE MOON“ (debut single)

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: We welcome on „SÜDAFRIKA – Land der Kontraste“ – the German Gateway to South Africa – Ms. Lindiwe Suttle, model and singer. May you please inform the readers where you come from and where you are based at the moment?

Answer: I was born and raised in USA to a South African Mother and an American Father. I was raised with traditional African values in a very American surrounding. I lived a very different lifestyle than my American friends. My mother taught me the values she learned from her grandparents.

I have lived in Cape Town in South Africa for the past nine years. Cape Town is an important city to me and I consider it my home. It is dear to my heart because this is where I launched my music career, which is significant in my life.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: You worked in the fashion industry with superstars like Beyoncé and Ciara. Which moment has changed your mind to switch over into self-expression? 

Answer: Being a stylist is a hard job. At the time many films were coming to Atlanta, my hometown. I was lucky singer Beyonce was the first big star I worked with, she was kind and humble to me even with all my beginner mistakes. I worked with other celebrities after her that were a little less forgiving.

The job of a stylist is challenging because everyone thinks they have great style. A makeup artist or hair stylist is seen to have a professional skill but style goes deeper it touches ones character. Not many people are open to changing their personal style like they would a hairstyle or wearing a different shade of lipstick.  Style suggestions are more personal, almost like a criticism to their character. In the end, I realized I excelled best at expressing my own personal style. I use fashion on stage in my theatrical shows, elaborately styled music videos and photo shoots. I love playing with fashion, it’s an expression of all my characters. The music is the core of everything and everything else is just extra to make it more visual.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: You are known as model, especially in South Africa. Magazines like Elle, Vogue, Cosmopolitan or GQ have reported about you. What does the South African fashion style represent?

Answer: I have been lucky to model for brands like face of Frazer Parfum and I was the face of the Woolworths beauty campaign. I never took the job as a model serious till I was in front of the camera. I give respect to models, it’s a tough job knowing the right angels for your face.

There is an abundance of talent in South Africa. The challenge now is getting the designers international exposure. I have been a big supporter of local talent since I have lived here. I credit them for getting my into Vogue Italy and helping me win style awards like Glamour Magazine’s Women of the Year – Style Icon and the 2010 SA Style Award. I have a great relationship with many South African designers, Lara Klawikowski, Kutloano Molokomme, Cleo Droomer all create costumes for my shows.

© Lindiwe Suttle as part of the Frazer Parfum campaign „Ambassador for Nature“

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: Additionally to your model job, you are performing as singer. Isn´t it an unusually combination? How could you combine both professions?

Answer: I have been a singer, songwriter and performance artist since I began my music career in 2007. I started out in business and after my MBA I worked in the fashion industry in fashion marketing, merchandising and eventually styling celebrities. I moved out of the entertainment business and moved to SA wanting to focus on my own goals. I worked in fashion buying in Cape Town for a couple of years and I learned a lot about the retail but felt too restricted in the corporate environment. I quit my job and that was when I found music again.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: We took notice, that are you in contact with Germans in artistic matters. Which impression do you have of Germany?

Answer: After I quit my corporate job I moved to Hamburg Germany for a relationship that eventually went bad. This relationship was a catalyst for me to starting writing lyrics all inspired by this love gone wrong. I worked in studio for the first time with Hamburg producer Benni Dernhoff. We created me first demo that I took to SA.  I auditioned as lead singer of The Collective Imagination, a jazz-hip-hop band and performed for one and half year with them. I launched my solo career end of 2009. I was discovered by German legend, Marius Mueller-Westernhagen and his wife Romney. They have been my big support in my music career. One year later, Marius connected me with Tim Renner and Motor Music, my management company. Motor Music introduced me to producer, Ivan Georgiev. Ivan and I worked on my debut album, Kamikaze Art all of 2011.

Lindiwe Suttle and the jazz-hip-hop band „The Collective Imagination“

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: South Africa is in German media mostly in context with negative headlines. Which are the biggest problems of this young democracy and what should politics and society do?

Answer: I think it is important to redesigning the current educational system to better prepare our youth for a prosperous future in the global market. I would love to  build a free skills training school in each community for all ages. There would be a variety of free classes offered like leadership classes for adults, arts for children, cooking, and sports. I think a good education is the first step to a better South Africa.

© Lindiwe Suttle: „My music comes from the heart and I feel it is the most open and honest I have been about the experiences in my life.“

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: Which dreams in private and professional view would you like to realize?

Answer: My biggest goal in my life is to stay healthy and happy without these two things nothing else can happen in your life. In music, I want to perform worldwide and tour my debut album, Kamikaze Art. My goal is perform at least 40 shows in 2012. I want  to take Kamikaze Art to audiences around the world and have them experience my live shows with me. My music comes from the heart and I feel it is the most open and honest I have been about the experiences in my life.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: Lindiwe Suttle, model and singer, thank you very much for this interview.

Soap Operas True Reflection Of Current SA?

South Africans are loving soaps

(Editor: Tuming Lee)

Part 1:

Generations, Muvhango and Scandal constitute the crème de la crème of Mzansi’s local soap operas, attracting millions of viewership every weekday during prime time. Generations, with a viewership of 4 458 000 is not called Mzansi’s most watched soapy for nothing. Even though South Africans still enjoy American Soaps, they can’t help but feel patriotic every time they have to watch Kenneth Mashaba, devious media mogul played by Seputla Sebogodi, delivering his usual spectacular, SAFTA (South African Film and Television Awards) deserving performance of kicking out a subordinate from his office, with the classic line, “A bo re gwaa!” (Northern Sotho’s equivalent of ‘Bugger Off.’) This proves once more that local is always lekker. Nothing can make you feel more nostalgic than a home grown TV production with next door faces and local languages.

Everybody in South Africa loves his soaps, even this Baby by watching „Generations“

Just as Nelson Mandela is affectionately known as Madiba which is a clan name of which Mr Mandela is a member, South Africa is now simply being referred to as Mzansi. Mzansi is a term of endearment that means south and it was given to SA by its fabulous and vibrant Nguni language speaking youth. As in Ayoba (township slang for cool!), the word Mzansi has sneaked its way into the vocabulary of every curious mind in the country – young and old, black and white, print and social media alike to become the latest unity symbol of the rainbow nation. It is only a matter of time before Mzansi and Ayoba find themselves cosy little spots in the South African English dictionary, a global recognition that is long overdue.

© Screenshot from TV soap "Generations" (Source: YouTube)

Everyday some men and women hurriedly clear up their work desk and rush through traffic to get home before 6 pm for one more dosage of their favourite soap opera. More so, men than women because most men would rather have their limbs amputated than willingly admit to watching soap operas. Why? Because soap watching is embarrassing and considered a chick thing. Besides, what are Peter’s colleagues and buddies supposed to think when they hear how he had traded a perfect two hours of beer drinking and loud burping for an early night in front of the couch, biting his nails and hugging his pillow listening to best friends, Tshidi and Puleng’s in etv’s Rhythm City talking about whether or not Tshidi should marry Dylan or abort the baby. How would the guys perceive Peter, knowing that he was clutching to a pillow, shedding a tear the moment he learnt about Cheryl’s conspiracy to snatch her employer, Braam le Roux and marry him from right under her best friend’s Marlien’s nose in order to gain control of BLR Empire and get back at his number one enemy, former prisoner and millionaire ex-husband Barker Heinz.

The convoluted commentary typically characterises a soap opera plot where normally everybody is related either by marriage or birth but continues to intermarry, resulting in family disoriented off springs with a serious series of identity crises. The producers think it is a winning formula hence the recurring, feminine plot in almost all soap operas, leaving men with little or no entertainment.

Uninviting as soap operas might be to men, more and more males are rationalising their soapy watching as an occasional sneak peek in order to keep up with their women’s interests and so they let the world believe. They are quick to label soaps as hogwash and are always on tenterhooks waiting to deny their involvement in soap operas. Unsettling behaviour indeed.

Kgogo e e lelang pele, lee ke la yone – loosely translated, this saying means ‘the egg belongs to the hen that crows first’. The first ones to deny watching soap operas are usually the ones that watch it. It is an attention deflecting tactic away from the real culprits.

Even though men would be the first to confess that they do not find the plot of soap operas the least bit appealing and that they are only watching because of their wives or girlfriends, it is surprising how quick they are to proclaiming, that even if one does not watch soap operas for a year, Brooke would still be pining for Ridge while Eric Forrester will still be lusting after another bold and beautiful young thing to take as his next wife.”

Lo and behold, one year later, Brooke is standing by Ridge’s office door at Forrester Creations wearing a little red number that leaves a lot to the imagination and Ridge is left drooling and speechless one more time. Across the hallway in another office, Eric is on the phone, charming the pants off of Brooke’s sister Donna, inviting her to meet him at the Big Bear Cabin because he is divorcing Stephanie who has finally agreed to sign the divorce papers. What a strange coincidence! It is either soap opera’s plots don’t change that much or the men are lying and do actually watch soap operas behind women’s back. Female intuition says it is the latter.

On a serious note though, if so many people watch soap operas, doesn’t that put responsibility on the soapy production team to provide material that contributes positively towards the advancement of society? Therefore the question remains: Are local soap operas a true reflection of the current South Africa? More on this in Soap Operas True Reflection Of Current SA, Part 2.