Schlagwort-Archive: shooting

Interview with model Lee-Ann Roberts

„South African fashion will always be slightly behind as it follows European trends“

(Autor/ Editor: Ghassan Abid)

Deutsche Interview-Zusammenfassung:

Lee-Ann Roberts zählt zu den erfolgreichsten Models in Südafrika. Sie hat es auf das renommierte FHM Magazin geschafft – ein Traum vieler Models. Als stolze Südafrikanerin aus Durban erläutert sie, dass sie vom Modelscout Leon Cloete aus Johannesburg/Pretoria endeckt wurde. Genauso wie Jo-Ann Strauss vertritt Lee-Ann Roberts den Standpunkt, dass die südafrikanische Modebranche national und global betrachtet relativ unbedeutend ist. Vielmehr folgt die südafrikanische Szene den Trends Europa´s. Auch hinkt Südafrika bedingt durch die umgekehrte Jahreszeit zwischen Nord- und Südhalbkugel den europäischen Modeideen hinterher. Gleichzeitig untermauert sie, dass ein Model für diesen Job folgende Eigenschaften aufbringen sollte: Leidenschaft, Selbstbewusststein und Enthusiasmus. Deutschland wird Lee-Ann Roberts in diesem Jahr das erste Mal besuchen. Sie schätzt die Professionalität und Höflichkeit deutscher Kunden; und vor allem die trendige deutsche (Damen-)Oberbekleidung.

© Lee-Ann Roberts, a proud east coast model from Durban (Picture source: http://www.leeannroberts.co.za)

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: We would like to welcome on „SÜDAFRIKA – Land der Kontraste“, the German Gateway to South Africa, Lee-Ann Roberts, model from Durban. Ms. Roberts, according to your website you are „a proud east coast girl“. What is South Africa standing for?

Answer: I am a proud East Coast girl indeed. I am from a small town Durban in South Africa, living along the sea side while growing up you cant get better than that. When i ask myself that question the first word that comes to mind is unity, how ever I love my country and I am proudly South African. Die Cape Town Fashion Week (CTFW) bewertet das Model als die kreativste Modeveranstaltung im Lande.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: You have been discovered by Leon Cloete, a model scout from Johannesburg, who is known in South African media as „the Guy with the Eye“. When it happened and what was your first impression of this really unique situation?

Answer: Leon and I started speaking in about 2008, I flew up to Johannesburg to meet him and then things started happening from there. After that I went to Johannesburg for his Model Events at FTV where I was meant to be the draw card for the event at the time, was so much fun and so very new for me.

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2010sdafrika-editorial staff: In an interview with us from March 2011, your model colleague Jo-Ann Strauss commented the fashion scene in South Africa. She said, that fashion in South Africa is still taking „a small role but it’s growing.“ Are you in the same opinion, that South African fashion is still relatively trivial in national and global view?

Answer: I definitely agree with Jo-Ann, South African fashion will always be slightly behind as it follows European trends and we are a season behind.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: Which fashion week is in South Africa the most important one and why?

Answer: I would say Cape Town Fashion Week (CTFW) as its the more creative hub of South Africa.

© Lee-Ann worked for the famous magazine FHM South Africa (Picture source: http://www.leeannroberts.co.za)

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: You have been worked for/ with several influential clients like FHM Magazine, Elle or Nokia. Which characteristics is representing your profession as model?

Answer: With my bubbly personality, confidence and enthusiasm I am able to interact with the clients to get my job done to the best I can with everyone being happy in the end.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: Have you been already in Germany and which perception do you have from German fashion as well as German culture?

Answer: Unfortunately I have not been to Germany. It is definitely a country I would like to visit this year. I have worked for German clients and the garments are always trendy and the clients are always friendly and professional.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: Which personal dreams would you like to realize?

Answer: I have been lucky enough to realize some dreams last year and I am very grateful and fortunate. I do have allot more dreams and goals on my list. My main dream is to carry on working hard, being successful, happy and make my mark in this world, as they say we all are here to do something.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: Lee-Ann Roberts, model from the east coast of South Africa, thank you very much for this interesting interview!

For more fashion news from South Africa read the

Fashion and Lifestyle Column by Sam Pegg

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History Documentary from South Africa

The real face of Apartheid

(Editor: Annalisa Wellhäuser)

The largest film festival in Germany, the „Berlinale„, has been attended by „SÜDAFRIKA – Land der Kontraste“, the German Gateway to South Africa. With thanks to the Berlinale section Generation, we have observed selected events and made a report. „History Uncut: Manenberg“ and „History Uncut: Crossroads“ – a documentary collection –  are focussing on South Africa during the apartheid.

Afravision (Brian Tilley, Laurence Dworkin): History Uncut

Co-curated by Darryl Els and Claus Löser

Sunday, 2/13/2010, Cinema Arsenal at Potsdamer Platz in Berlin

Episode 1: Crossroads

Switch off the lights, the movie starts, open your eyes: as if I had used a time-machine for a journey back into the past ,out of a sudden I find myself in May/June 1986 of the former Apartheid-State of South Africa. Place of the setting: „Crossroads„, an informal settlement for „ black„ South Africans ,important centre for movements of resistance; actually it was given the status of an „emergency camp„ and therefore being immune to the mass clearance of townships by the state. Of course the government was not pleased about this immunity…..So here I am….in the middle of a brutal battle between-well, one does not even know who belongs to which group, it is a chaos…People ,especially boys who are only teenagers are running from one site to the other…they are chasing each other….shooting….screams…wherever I look I see destroyed and burning houses of corrugated iron sheet…It is this group with the strips of white cloth, they are attacking us…it is the „Witdoeks„, our vigilance committee. Why are they doing that? It`s our own people! Where did they get the weapons from? We have to fight back…self-made arms out of wood, stones, gunpowder in plastic bottles, which are being thrown…on the street: two men on the floor…covered by blood all over… they are dead…. I see women sitting on the street corner with their babies and the things which they still managed to rescue from their homes…they are waiting for help….

© Scene from „Histroy Uncut: Manenberg“ (Source: Berlinale)

© Logo of film festival „Berlinale“ (Source: Wikimedia)

Cut- change of scene

Women standing with their babies at the entrance of the parliament of Cape Town. They are hopeless and are looking for help. „ We don`t know what you are talking about, we cannot do anything for you„, they get told in Afrikaans by a politician. As a symbol of protest the women start to feign crying and lay down their crying babies in front of the parliament.

According to the TRC, the Truth Reconciliation Commission of South Africa, South African police contributed weapons to and supported groups of „black„ South Africans like the ,,Witdoeks„, a vigilance committee in Crossroads, and thereby „used „ them in order to suppress movements of resistance during the time of Apartheid. Thus the government seeked their aim without being blamed for anything. In total 60.000 people became homeless and 60 people died.

Episode 2: Manenberg

It is September 1989, the election day of the tricameral parliament of South Africa. „white„ and limitedly „coloured„ and „indian´` South Africans are allowed to vote.

The „black„ population is excluded from the right to vote. In „Manenberg„ , a township for „coloured„ South Africans there are protests taking place. And me- I see, no, I experience closely what happens on that day in the streets of Manenberg: I am in a house and I am looking out of a window. The police pitches up out of nowhere and starts shooting randomly with rubber munition at the residents of the place. Yes, it even seems like they do so because they enjoy seeing other people suffering. The police men throw stones at the people, use tear gas and chase them into their houses with whips. The inhabitants ,especially young people, react by throwing stones as well and by building street barriers out of car wheels, litter, pieces of furniture and stones to which they set fire. It is a seesaw. The police arrives frequently and it results in a conflict: Shooting, screams….I`m afraid that they will discover me, but I`m lucky-they don`t.

Cut- Change of scene:

A boy is lieing half covered in a bed, his entire body is full bullet wounds caused by the rubber munition of the police. Another boy`s head is bandaged up and his nose is covered by plasters…A women expresses a direct appeal to the South African government, she claims a democratic, NON- racial discriminatorial electoral system.

These scenes were never shown on South African television; they are part of the archive`s material of the video collective Afravision, which contains the biggest documentation of video of the history of resistance. Afravision was founded by Brian Tilley, Laurence Dworkin und Mokoenyana Moletse in order to keep records of the numerous battles in South Africa in the 1980s .

An extraordinary and fascinating contribution to the Berlinale of 2010. Uncut and pure- this film shows simply the reality and truth-the tragic reality of the past South Africa. Such a close experience of history; it feels as if having been present at that time. It is unbelievable, because suddenly it is not a „story„ anymore that one happened to read in a „history book„ and that seems unreal and far away from oneself. Out of a sudden it is my own reality too. I`m part of it. After watching the film, I`m only left with one single thought dominating my mind: While I can return into my secure reality of the present Germany, this „ film„ did continue for the people in South Africa at that time. Those people, who I met just now, could not flee in contrary to me who just switches off the movie. For them it was a nightmare and they did not know if it would ever end. This is horrible.

The 2010sdafrika-editorial staff would like to thank to the team of Berlinale section Panorama for supporting our service.