Schlagwort-Archive: South African

Sightseeing-Must See for Berlin tourists

Why South Africans should take a visit at the Berlin TV Tower. A report from 200 meters height

(Editor: Ghassan Abid)

Berlin has been around for long time one of the most attractive international destinations. Increasingly more tourists from Africa, especially from Egypt and South Africa, explore Berlin. Likewise, the South African community in the UK is repeatedly in the German capital, who spot the city on the Spree river with relatives or friends. The Berlin TV Tower, in German „Berliner Fernsehturm“, at Alexanderplatz is a sightseeing must see. The editorial-staff of „SÜDAFRIKA – Land der Kontraste“, the German Gateway to South Africa, looked at the highest publicly available building in Germany. A report from 200 meters height.

© The Berlin TV Tower, in German „Berliner Fernsehturm“, is counting to one of the most popular sightseeing places in Germany. Tourists from all over the world are visiting this 368 meter high building, a must see for South African tourists.

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Ubuntu in Germany Column

Make your mark when you cast your vote

(Editor: Alex Smit-Stachowski is speaking in her column about life as a South African now living in Germany. The South African journalist lives in Krefeld, in North Rhine-Westphalia/ Germany).

Sunday was Africa Day and when those in Europe took to the voting stations, to cast votes in the European and communal elections. As a South African, the two recent elections have proved quite interesting. We should treasure our right to vote!

linke

© One of the parties in the communal and EU election is DIE LINKE and they promise no weapon exports to Africa – pertinent to a South African living in Europe.

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Ubuntu in Germany Column

Anuga Trade Show in Cologne:  Photo essay on South African exhibitors

(Editor: Alex Smit-Stachowski is speaking in her column about life as a South African now living in Germany. The South African journalist lives in Krefeld, in North Rhine-Westphalia/ Germany).

The Anuga Trade Show in Cologne is the largest trade show for the food service and catering market in the world. Alexandra Smit-Stachowski visited the South African pavilion and spoke to a few exhibitors.

© The Anuga Trade Show was held in Cologne recently. The South Africa Pavilion saw 40 exhibitors offering a wide range of products from sorbet sushi to ready-made African fast food.

© The Anuga Trade Show was held in Cologne recently. The South Africa Pavilion saw 40 exhibitors offering a wide range of products from sorbet sushi to ready-made African fast food.

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Ubuntu in Germany Column

Some Whites fear Genocide if Madiba Passes, so the thesis by a group of Conservatives

(Editor: Alex Smit-Stachowski is speaking in her column about life as a South African now living in Germany. The South African journalist lives in Krefeld, in North Rhine-Westphalia/ Germany).

It seems like a joke – a throwback to the early 90’s where whites packed tins in anticipation of civil war as negotiations between politicians got testy. It is deadly serious – there is a sector of the white population who fear if former President Nelson Mandela dies, there will be a bloodbath and they will be the victims.

© A group of conservative whites fear that when Madiba passes and the initial mourning period in South Africa has been observed, it will be a free-for-all for angry blacks to massacre them. Ubuntu-Columnist Alex Smit-Stachowski is checking this thesis.

© A group of conservative whites fear that when Madiba passes and the initial mourning period in South Africa has been observed, it will be a free-for-all for angry blacks to massacre them. Ubuntu-Columnist Alex Smit-Stachowski is checking this thesis.

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Ubuntu in Germany Column

South Africa would have handled the NSU trial better

(Editor: Alex Smit-Stachowski is speaking in her column about life as a South African now living in Germany. The South African journalist lives in Krefeld, in North Rhine-Westphalia/ Germany).

Germany recently began the largest trial in its history post-WWII –the NSU trial, which is examining the murders of eight Turks, a Greek, a German policewoman and 15 bank robberies by a neo-Nazi gang over the period of seven years.

© National Socialist Underground (NSU) members Mundlos, Zschäpe and Böhnhardt. South Africa would have handled the NSU trial better, says Ubuntu-Columnist Alex Smit-Stachowski. (Source: Bundeskriminalamt)

© National Socialist Underground (NSU) members Mundlos, Zschäpe and Böhnhardt. South Africa would have handled the NSU trial better, says Ubuntu-Columnist Alex Smit-Stachowski. (Source: Bundeskriminalamt)

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Ubuntu in Germany Column

Südafrikanisches Englisch – eine Masala-Mischung aus einheimischen Wörtern

(Editor: Alex Smit-Stachowski is speaking in her column about life as a South African now living in Germany. The South African journalist lives in Krefeld, in North Rhine-Westphalia/ Germany).

I’m tuning you the truth, bru! Wie Südafrikaner wirklich Englisch sprechen…

South Africans speak a wonderful version of English – a mixed masala of indigenous words thrown in and pronounced in only the way us South Africans can talk.

The Oscar-nominated documentary ‘Searching for Sugar Man’ about the lifelong passion of South Africans for the lesser-known American folk singer, Rodriguez – again highlighted how special the English is, that we born and bred in SA is.

Spoken with a broad accent, we often plough ahead, not realizing that quite a few words are only familiar to those who schooled in South Africa. This hilarious clip which did the rounds on YouTube a few months ago, rounds up the typical South-Africanisms that tourists are likely to hear when visiting Cape Town, Durban or Johannesburg.

© South African English -  only to be understood by the locals. (Quelle: flickr/ coda)

© South African English – only to be understood by locals. (Quelle: flickr/ coda)

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Fotograf Jürgen Schadeberg im Interview

Die Interpretation von Fotos liegt im Auge des Betrachters

(Autor/ Editor: Ghassan Abid)

Deutsche Interview-Zusammenfassung:

Jürgen Schadeberg ist der deutsche Top-Fotograf bei südafrikanischen Motiven schlechthin. Der Berliner wird nicht ohne Grund als „The Father of South African Photography” bezeichnet. Schon 1950 emigrierte er nach Südafrika, um den Kampf gegen die Apartheid künstlerisch zu begleiten. Er hatte bereits beeindruckende Ikonen wie Nelson Mandela, Walter Sisulu oder Miriam Makeba vor seiner Linse.  Vor allem die Vereidigung Mandela´s zum ersten schwarzen Präsidenten in Südafrika verbindet Schadeberg mit seinem eindrucksvollsten Erlebnis am Kap. Das Land verfüge mittlerweile über eine starke Werbefotografie, allerdings ist das Dokumentationsspektrum dessen weiterhin schwach aufgestellt. Mit seinen Fotowerken, etwa mit der Township-Fotoserie „Soweto in colour“, schnappt er gerne jene Momente ein, die alltägliche Begebenheiten darstellen. Die Interpretation seiner Bilder, so Schadeberg, überlässt er dem jeweiligen Betrachter. Die gegenwärtige Rückwärtsentwicklung Südafrikas erwidert der Fotograf mit dem Willen, niemals aufgeben zu dürfen. „SÜDAFRIKA – Land der Kontraste“ dankt Jürgen Schadeberg für die Bereitstellung von Fotos, insbesondere aus der Kollektion „Tales from Jozi“.

Redaktioneller Hinweis: Es wird vorsorglich darauf hingewiesen, dass eine Verwendung des abgebildeten Bildmaterials ohne entsprechende Genehmigung der Rechteinhaber nicht gestattet ist!

© Jürgen Schadeberg is known as “The Father of South African Photography”

© Jürgen Schadeberg is known as “The Father of South African Photography”

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: We would like to welcome on „SÜDAFRIKA – Land der Kontraste“, the German Gateway to South Africa, Mr. Jürgen Schadeberg, photographer and film director from Berlin.

Answer: Mr. Schadeberg, you are known as a very famous photographer, who left Germany for South Africa in 1950. Which reasons had motivated you to emigrate?

I wanted to leave war-torn Germany and find some adventure in the new world.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: You accompanied with your arts the struggle against Apartheid. Would you have ever imagined that apartheid will be someday over?

Answer: I believed that such an inhuman system as Apartheid could not have lasted.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: You captured with your camera several South African personalities like Nelson Mandela, Walter Sisulu or Miriam Makeba. Which has been your most impressive moment in South Africa?

Answer: When Nelson Mandela was elected President and for a time the country was united.

© Mandela's return to his Cell on Robben Island 1994/ series: Mandela (Picture Source: www.jurgenschadeberg.com)

© Mandela's return to his Cell on Robben Island 1994/ series: Mandela (Picture Source: http://www.jurgenschadeberg.com)

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: Why did you used monochrome pictures in regard to Mandela & Co.?

Answer: During the fifties in SA there was very little work done in colour because the technology was not advanced enough.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: In some media, you are called as “The Father of South African Photography”. Is South Africa having at all a photography industry?

Answer: Yes, there is a thriving primarily commercial photography world but documentary photography is developing well.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: Your photo series „Soweto in colour“ is catching day-to-day situations of the township population. Which message would you communicate to the viewers?

Answer: The message is in the eye of the beholder.

© SOWETO TODAY/ series: Soweto in colour (Picture Source: www.jurgenschadeberg.com)

© SOWETO TODAY/ series: Soweto in colour (Picture Source: http://www.jurgenschadeberg.com)

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: South Africa is making, today, some setbacks in democracy. With corruption cases, the Secrecy Bill or hate speech by famous figures like Julius Malema, is the rainbow nation coming under pressure. Are you still following the developments in South Africa and if yes, what is your mind in this issue?

Answer: Yes, it’somewhat disappointing but one doesn’t give up hope.

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: Which further dreams would you like to realize?

Answer: To leave in peace and harmony and continue my work.

© Kids on staircase/ series: Tales from Jozi (Picture Source: www.jurgenschadeberg.com)

© Kids on staircase/ series: Tales from Jozi (Picture Source: http://www.jurgenschadeberg.com)

© Malako Club/ series: Tales from Jozi (Picture Source: www.jurgenschadeberg.com)

© Malako Club/ series: Tales from Jozi (Picture Source: http://www.jurgenschadeberg.com)

© Joyce Nzama & Baby/ series: Tales from Jozi (Picture Source: www.jurgenschadeberg.com)

© Joyce Nzama & Baby/ series: Tales from Jozi (Picture Source: http://www.jurgenschadeberg.com)

© Chalsea Hotel/ series: Tales from Jozi (Picture Source: www.jurgenschadeberg.com)

© Chalsea Hotel/ series: Tales from Jozi (Picture Source: http://www.jurgenschadeberg.com)

© Rose Boys/ series: Tales from Jozi (Picture Source: www.jurgenschadeberg.com)

© Rose Boys/ series: Tales from Jozi (Picture Source: http://www.jurgenschadeberg.com)

2010sdafrika-editorial staff: Jürgen Schadeberg, photographer and film director, thank you very much for this interview!

2010sdafrika-Interview mit der Fotografin Zanele Muholi:

https://2010sdafrika.wordpress.com/2010/05/31/exklusive-interview-with-zanele-muholi/

2010sdafrika-Interview mit dem Fotografen Louis Vorster:

https://2010sdafrika.wordpress.com/2011/11/16/multimedia-projects-by-louis-vorster/

2010sdafrika-Interview mit dem Fotografen Roger Ballen:

https://2010sdafrika.wordpress.com/2011/03/20/photos-with-reflection-on-the-psyche-roger-ballen-in-interview/