Schlagwort-Archive: Witdoeks

History Documentary from South Africa

The real face of Apartheid

(Editor: Annalisa Wellhäuser)

The largest film festival in Germany, the „Berlinale„, has been attended by „SÜDAFRIKA – Land der Kontraste“, the German Gateway to South Africa. With thanks to the Berlinale section Generation, we have observed selected events and made a report. „History Uncut: Manenberg“ and „History Uncut: Crossroads“ – a documentary collection –  are focussing on South Africa during the apartheid.

Afravision (Brian Tilley, Laurence Dworkin): History Uncut

Co-curated by Darryl Els and Claus Löser

Sunday, 2/13/2010, Cinema Arsenal at Potsdamer Platz in Berlin

Episode 1: Crossroads

Switch off the lights, the movie starts, open your eyes: as if I had used a time-machine for a journey back into the past ,out of a sudden I find myself in May/June 1986 of the former Apartheid-State of South Africa. Place of the setting: „Crossroads„, an informal settlement for „ black„ South Africans ,important centre for movements of resistance; actually it was given the status of an „emergency camp„ and therefore being immune to the mass clearance of townships by the state. Of course the government was not pleased about this immunity…..So here I am….in the middle of a brutal battle between-well, one does not even know who belongs to which group, it is a chaos…People ,especially boys who are only teenagers are running from one site to the other…they are chasing each other….shooting….screams…wherever I look I see destroyed and burning houses of corrugated iron sheet…It is this group with the strips of white cloth, they are attacking us…it is the „Witdoeks„, our vigilance committee. Why are they doing that? It`s our own people! Where did they get the weapons from? We have to fight back…self-made arms out of wood, stones, gunpowder in plastic bottles, which are being thrown…on the street: two men on the floor…covered by blood all over… they are dead…. I see women sitting on the street corner with their babies and the things which they still managed to rescue from their homes…they are waiting for help….

© Scene from „Histroy Uncut: Manenberg“ (Source: Berlinale)

© Logo of film festival „Berlinale“ (Source: Wikimedia)

Cut- change of scene

Women standing with their babies at the entrance of the parliament of Cape Town. They are hopeless and are looking for help. „ We don`t know what you are talking about, we cannot do anything for you„, they get told in Afrikaans by a politician. As a symbol of protest the women start to feign crying and lay down their crying babies in front of the parliament.

According to the TRC, the Truth Reconciliation Commission of South Africa, South African police contributed weapons to and supported groups of „black„ South Africans like the ,,Witdoeks„, a vigilance committee in Crossroads, and thereby „used „ them in order to suppress movements of resistance during the time of Apartheid. Thus the government seeked their aim without being blamed for anything. In total 60.000 people became homeless and 60 people died.

Episode 2: Manenberg

It is September 1989, the election day of the tricameral parliament of South Africa. „white„ and limitedly „coloured„ and „indian´` South Africans are allowed to vote.

The „black„ population is excluded from the right to vote. In „Manenberg„ , a township for „coloured„ South Africans there are protests taking place. And me- I see, no, I experience closely what happens on that day in the streets of Manenberg: I am in a house and I am looking out of a window. The police pitches up out of nowhere and starts shooting randomly with rubber munition at the residents of the place. Yes, it even seems like they do so because they enjoy seeing other people suffering. The police men throw stones at the people, use tear gas and chase them into their houses with whips. The inhabitants ,especially young people, react by throwing stones as well and by building street barriers out of car wheels, litter, pieces of furniture and stones to which they set fire. It is a seesaw. The police arrives frequently and it results in a conflict: Shooting, screams….I`m afraid that they will discover me, but I`m lucky-they don`t.

Cut- Change of scene:

A boy is lieing half covered in a bed, his entire body is full bullet wounds caused by the rubber munition of the police. Another boy`s head is bandaged up and his nose is covered by plasters…A women expresses a direct appeal to the South African government, she claims a democratic, NON- racial discriminatorial electoral system.

These scenes were never shown on South African television; they are part of the archive`s material of the video collective Afravision, which contains the biggest documentation of video of the history of resistance. Afravision was founded by Brian Tilley, Laurence Dworkin und Mokoenyana Moletse in order to keep records of the numerous battles in South Africa in the 1980s .

An extraordinary and fascinating contribution to the Berlinale of 2010. Uncut and pure- this film shows simply the reality and truth-the tragic reality of the past South Africa. Such a close experience of history; it feels as if having been present at that time. It is unbelievable, because suddenly it is not a „story„ anymore that one happened to read in a „history book„ and that seems unreal and far away from oneself. Out of a sudden it is my own reality too. I`m part of it. After watching the film, I`m only left with one single thought dominating my mind: While I can return into my secure reality of the present Germany, this „ film„ did continue for the people in South Africa at that time. Those people, who I met just now, could not flee in contrary to me who just switches off the movie. For them it was a nightmare and they did not know if it would ever end. This is horrible.

The 2010sdafrika-editorial staff would like to thank to the team of Berlinale section Panorama for supporting our service.

Berlinale 2011: Der Südafrika-Veranstaltungsbericht

„SÜDAFRIKA – Land der Kontraste“ bewertet Filmfestival

(Autoren: Annalisa Wellhäuser, Doreen S., Ghassan Abid)

© Logo Berlinale (Quelle: Wikimedia)

Die Berlinale 2011 war auch in diesem Jahr eine interessante deutsche „Have To See-Veranstaltung“  in punkto Kultur aus Südafrika. Mit freundlicher Unterstützung der Berlinale-Sektion Generation, durfte die 2010sdafrika-Redaktion ausgewählte Veranstaltungen besuchen und hierüber einen Bericht ablegen. Mit „History Uncut: Manenberg“ und „History Uncut: Crossroads“ wurde Südafrika während der Apartheid dokumentarisch unter die Lupe genommen, während im Spielfilm „State of Violence“ das Augenmerk auf das Südafrika von heute gerichtet wurde, auf die Probleme und Herausforderungen dieser jungen Demokratie.

Afravision (Brian Tilley, Laurence Dworkin)

History Uncut(von Annalisa Wellhäuser)

Kokuratiert von Darryl Els und Claus Löser

Sonntag, 13.02.2010, Kino Arsenal am Potsdamer Platz in Berlin

Episode 1: Crossroads

Licht aus, Film ab und Augen auf: Wie durch eine Zeitmaschine in die Vergangenheit katapultiert bin ich auf einmal im Mai/ Juni 1986 im ehemaligen Apartheid-Staat Südafrika. Ort des Geschehens: „Crossroads“, eine informelle Siedlung Kapstadts für schwarze Südafrikaner, Hochburg von Widerstandsbewegungen; eigentlich „Notfall camp„ und somit immun gegen die Massenräumung von Townships- ganz zum Missfallen der Regierung…..

Hier bin ich also….mittendrin in einer brutalen Schlacht zwischen- ja man weiß gar nicht wer zu wem gehört, es ist ein Durcheinander…Menschen ,vor allem Jungs im jugendlichen Alter rennen in Massen hin und her… sie jagen sich gegenseitig….Schüsse fallen…Geschrei… wohin ich auch blicke, ich sehe zerstörte, brennende Wellblechhäuser….Es ist die Gruppe mit den weißen Stoffbändern, die greifen uns an… das sind die ,,Witdoeks„, unsere Bürgerwehr……Warum tun sie das? Sie gehören doch zu uns !Woher haben sie die Waffen? Wir müssen uns wehren…selbstgebastelte Waffen aus Holz, Steinen; Schießpulver in Plastikflaschen, die geworfen werden…..auf der Straße: zwei Männer auf dem Boden…voller Blut…sie sind tot…ich sehe Frauen mit Babies, die mit dem Hab und Gut, was sie noch retten konnten, am Straßenrand sitzen, auf Hilfe warten, …..

Cut- Szenenwechsel

Frauen stehen mit ihren Kindern am Parlamentseingang in Kapstadt. Sie sind verzweifelt und suchen Hilfe. ,,Wir wissen von nichts, wir können nichts machen„, wird ihnen auf Afrikaans von einem Politiker entgegnet. Aus Protest simulieren die Frauen ein Weinen und legen ihre schreienden Babies vor dem Parlament nieder.

Laut TRC, der Truth Reconciliation Commission Südafrikas, wurden während der Apartheid Gruppen von ,,schwarzen„ Bürgern wie die ,,Witdoeks„, einer bereits bestehende Bürgerwehr in Crossroads, von der südafrikanischen Polizei mit Waffen unterstützt und somit ,,benutzt„ , um Widerstandsbewegungen in Townships zu bekämpfen. So erreichte die Regierung ihr Ziel , ohne dabei selbst ins schlechte Licht zu rücken. Es wurden 60.000 Menschen obdachlos und 60 Menschen kamen zu Tode.

Episode 2: Manenberg

Es ist September 1989, der Tag der Wahlen des Dreikammer Parlaments in Südafrika. Wahlberechtigte sind ,, weiße „ und begrenzt auch ,,farbige„ (,,coloured„)und ,,indische„ Südafrikaner. Die,, schwarze„ Bevölkerung ist ausgeschlossen. In ,,Manenberg„, einem Township für ,,farbige„ ( „coloured„ ) Südafrikaner, kommt es zum Protest .Und ich sehe, nein ich erlebe hautnah mit, was sich an diesem Tag auf Manenberg`s Straßen abspielt: Ich bin in einem Haus und blicke aus einem Fensterspalt auf die Straße. Was ich dort sehe ist ein Schauspiel zwischen Polizei und den Bewohnern der Siedlung. Die Polizei ,welche aus heiterem Himmel aufgetaucht ist, schießt wahllos mit Gummipatronen in die Menschenmassen. Ja, es scheint gar als täten sie dies, weil es ihnen Spaß macht, andere Leute leiden zu sehen. Die Polizisten bewerfen die Township-Bewohner mit Steinen, verwenden Tränengas und jagen diese mit Peitschen in ihre Häuser. Die Leute, vor allem Jugendliche, reagieren darauf, indem sie mit Steinen zurück werfen und Straßenbarrikaden aus Autoreifen, Müll, Möbelstücken und Steinen errichten und diese dann anzünden. Es ist ein Hin und Her. Immer wieder kommt die Polizei und es kommt zur Auseinandersetzung: Schießerei, Geschrei,…. Ich befürchte die gesamte Zeit über, dass sie mich entdecken, doch ich habe Glück. Sie sehen mich nicht.

© Szene aus „History Uncut: Manenberg“ (Quelle: Berlinale)

Cut- Szenenwechsel

Ein Junge liegt leicht bekleidet in einem Bett, sein Körper ist übersät mit Einschüssen, verursacht durch die Gummipatronen der Polizei. Ein anderer Junge hat den Kopf verbunden und die Nase ist mit Pflastern überdeckt….Eine Frau richtet klar und deutlich einen Appell an die südafrikanische Regierung, sie fordert ein demokratisches, NICHT-rassendiskriminierendes Wahlsystem. Diese Szenen wurden nie im südafrikanischen Fernsehen ausgestrahlt; sie gehören zu dem Archivmaterial der Videokollektive Afravision, welches die größte Videodokumentation der Widerstandsgeschichte darstellt. Gegründet wurde Afravision von Brian Tilley, Laurence Dworkin und Mokoenyana Moletse ,um die zahlreichen Kämpfe der 1980er Jahre in Südafrika zu dokumentieren.

Ein außergewöhnlicher und faszinierender Beitrag zur Berlinale 2010. Ungeschnitten und unverfälscht zeigt dieser Film schlicht und einfach die Realität und Wahrheit, wie sie sich tragischerweise im damaligen Südafrika zugetragen hat. Man erlebt Geschichte hautnah; man fühlt sich, als wenn man selbst dabei gewesen wäre. Es ist unglaublich, denn plötzlich ist es ist keine ,,Geschichte„ mehr, von der man mal im ,,Geschichtsbuch„ gelesen hat und die einem irreal und weit weg vorkommt. Es ist auf einmal auch meine eigene Realität. Ich bin dabei. Nach dem Film geht mir dann nur noch ein Gedanke durch den Kopf: Während ich in meine sichere Wirklichkeit des heutigen Deutschlands zurückkehren kann, ist dieser ,,Film„ für die Menschen in Südafrika damals weitergelaufen. Diese Menschen, denen man gerade begegnet ist, konnten im Gegensatz zu mir, die den Film ausschaltet, nicht fliehen. Für sie war es ein Albtraum, von dem sie nicht wussten, ob er jemals enden würde. Das ist einfach schrecklich.

Datenblatt zur Doku „History Uncut: Manenberg“:

http://www.berlinale.de/external/de/filmarchiv/doku_pdf/20110388.pdf

AfricanHistory.com zu Crossroads-Geschehnissen:

http://africanhistory.about.com/od/apartheid/p/crossroads.htm

————————————————–

Pyramide International (Khalo Matabane)

State of Violence(von Doreen S. und Ghassan Abid)

Sonntag, 20.02.2010, Kino CineStar am Potsdamer Platz in Berlin

„State of Violence“ ist ein beeindruckender Film aus französisch-südafrikanischer Produktion von 2010. Er thematisiert die gegenwärtige wohl größte Herausforderung Südafrikas nach der Apartheid, nämlich die brutale Gewalt und immense Perspektivlosigkeit im Lande. Bobedi, gespielt von Fana Mokoena, ist ein erfolgreicher CEO eines Bergbauunternehmens, der den Wohlstand mit seiner liebevollen Frau Joy (Darstellerin: Lindi Matshikiza) sichtlich genießt. Beide sind im neuen Südafrika angekommen; im Gegensatz zur überwiegend armen Bevölkerungsmehrheit. Vor allem Bobedi stammte ursprünglich aus einem Armenviertel, dem Johannesburger Stadtteil Alexandra. Tolle Kleider für die Frau, eine große Villa und ein Mercedes Benz machten den Alltag dieses erfolgreichen sowie berühmten „Black Diamond“ aus.

© Szene mit Boy-Boy aus „State of Violence“ (Quelle: Berlinale)

Eines Tages jedoch erlebt Bobedi die knallharten Schattenseiten Südafrikas. Im eigenen Haus attackiert ein maskierter Einbrecher Joy und bringt sie, vor den Augen ihres Ehemannes, nach unzähligen Schlägen anschließend mit einer Schusswaffe um. Der Fremde wollte aber kein Geld, sondern Bobedi großen Leid und tiefsten Schmerz zufügen. Innerhalb von wenigen Minuten ist dessen schönes Leben in ein Scherbenhaufen zerschlagen worden.

Erschüttert durch dieses schreckliche Erlebnis und mit voller Wut sowie Trauer im Herzen, begibt sich Bobedi auf die Suche nach dem Mörder in sein Heimatort Alexandra. Die Erinnerung an die große Blutlache im Badezimmer und die weinenden Schreie seiner Frau verfolgen ihn als posttraumatisches Erlebnis. Er begibt sich auf eine Reise in das eigene Ich; eine Reise in die eigene dunkle Vergangenheit.

Bobedi stammt selber aus dem Township und musste, wohl als Mutprobe im Rahmen einer Gang, einen Mann am lebendigen Leibe verbrennen. Es handelte sich hierbei um den Vater seines eigenen Cousins OJ (Darsteller: Neo Ntlatleng), der sich als Mörder von Joy herausstellte und mit der Tat seinen Vater auf diesem Wege rächen wollte. Nur der Bruder von Bobedi, Boy-Boy (gespielt von Presley Chweneyagae), steht ihm bei der Verfolgung des Täters anfänglich bei, doch nach und nach versucht er ihm ins Gewissen zu reden und dessen Verlangen nach Rache abzuwenden. Bei dem Versuch, dass weder Bruder noch Cousin ebenfalls sterben müssen, erliegt Boy-Boy durch einen versehentlich ausgelösten Schuss an seinen Verletzungen. Erneut stirbt ein Familienangehöriger, bedingt durch den Durst auf Rache, und Bobedi hat erneut ein Menschenleben auf den Gewissen.

In „State of Violence“ packt eine Vendetta der besonderen Art den Zuschauer. Es stellen sich im Verlauf des Films die Fragen, ob es eine Rache auf die Rache geben kann, wo Moral anfängt bzw. diese endet und ob die Selbstjustiz überhaupt einen adäquaten Ersatz zur staatlichen Strafverfolgung darstellen kann. Dieser Film, welcher vom Regisseur Khalo Matabane betreut wurde, ähnelt von der Aufmachung und Story her dem erfolgreichen Film „Tsotsi“ von Gavin Hood. Matabane gilt als Experte für die Regieführung südafrikanischer Dokumentationen (Young Lions (2000), Love in the Time of Sickness (2002), Story of a Beautiful Country (2004) u.a.). Mit „State of Violence“ ist ihm der erste Spielfilm überhaupt in punkto Story, Szenenaufbau, soziokritischem Bewusstsein und technischer Umsetzung durchaus geglückt und absolut sehenswert. Neben dem Film „Tsotsi“ verfügt Südafrika über ein weiteres Highlight auf dem kinematografischen Bereich.

Datenblatt zum Film „State of Violence“:

http://www.berlinale.de/external/de/filmarchiv/doku_pdf/20110011.pdf

2010sdafrika-Artikel zum Südafrika-Filmangebot der Berlinale 2011:

https://2010sdafrika.wordpress.com/2011/02/10/berlinale-2011-kinematografie-sudafrikas-wieder-dabei/

Afravision (Brian Tilley, Laurence Dworkin)

History Uncut

Kokuratiert von Darryl Els und Claus Löser

Sonntag, 13.02.2010, Kino Arsenal am Potsdamerplatz

Episode 1: Crossroads

Licht aus, Film ab und Augen auf: Wie durch eine Zeitmaschine in die Vergangenheit katapultiert bin ich auf einmal im Mai/ Juni 1986 im ehemaligen Apartheid-Staat Südafrika. Ort des Geschehens: ,,Crossroads„ , eine informelle Siedlung Kapstadts für ,,schwarze„ Südafrikaner, Hochburg von Widerstandsbewegungen; eigentlich „Notfall camp„ und somit immun gegen die Massenräumung von Townships- ganz zum Missfallen der Regierung…..

Hier bin ich also….mittendrin in einer brutalen Schlacht zwischen- ja man weiß gar nicht wer zu wem gehört, es ist ein Durcheinander…Menschen ,vor allem Jungs im jugendlichen Alter rennen in Massen hin und her… sie jagen sich gegenseitig….Schüsse fallen…Geschrei… wohin ich auch blicke, ich sehe zerstörte, brennende Wellblechhäuser….Es ist die Gruppe mit den weißen Stoffbändern, die greifen uns an… das sind die ,,Witdoeks„, unsere Bürgerwehr……Warum tun sie das? Sie gehören doch zu uns !Woher haben sie die Waffen? Wir müssen uns wehren…selbstgebastelte Waffen aus Holz, Steinen; Schießpulver in Plastikflaschen, die geworfen werden…..auf der Straße: zwei Männer auf dem Boden…voller Blut…sie sind tot…ich sehe Frauen mit Babies, die mit dem Hab und Gut, was sie noch retten konnten, am Straßenrand sitzen, auf Hilfe warten, …..

Cut- Szenenwechsel:

Frauen stehen mit ihren Kindern am Parlamentseingang in Kapstadt. Sie sind verzweifelt und suchen Hilfe. ,,Wir wissen von nichts, wir können nichts machen„, wird ihnen auf Afrikaans von einem Politiker entgegnet. Aus Protest simulieren die Frauen ein Weinen und legen ihre schreienden Babies vor dem Parlament nieder.

Laut TRC, der Truth Reconciliation Commission Südafrikas, wurden während der Apartheid Gruppen von ,,schwarzen„ Bürgern wie die ,,Witdoeks„, einer bereits bestehende Bürgerwehr in Crossroads, von der südafrikanischen Polizei mit Waffen unterstützt und somit ,,benutzt„ , um Widerstandsbewegungen in Townships zu bekämpfen. So erreichte die Regierung ihr Ziel , ohne dabei selbst ins schlechte Licht zu rücken. Es wurden 60.000 Menschen obdachlos und 60 Menschen kamen zu Tode.

Episode 2:Manenberg

Es ist September 1989, der Tag der Wahlen des Dreikammer Parlaments in Südafrika. Wahlberechtigte sind ,, weiße „ und begrenzt auch ,,farbige„ (,,coloured„)und ,,indische„ Südafrikaner. Die,, schwarze„ Bevölkerung ist ausgeschlossen. In ,,Manenberg„, einem Township für ,,farbige„ ( „coloured„ ) Südafrikaner, kommt es zum Protest .Und ich sehe, nein ich erlebe hautnah mit, was sich an diesem Tag auf Manenberg`s Straßen abspielt: Ich bin in einem Haus und blicke aus einem Fensterspalt auf die Straße. Was ich dort sehe ist ein Schauspiel zwischen Polizei und den Bewohnern der Siedlung. Die Polizei ,welche aus heiterem Himmel aufgetaucht ist, schießt wahllos mit Gummipatronen in die Menschenmassen. Ja, es scheint gar als täten sie dies, weil es ihnen Spaß macht, andere Leute leiden zu sehen. Die Polizisten bewerfen die Township-Bewohner mit Steinen, verwenden Tränengas und jagen diese mit Peitschen in ihre Häuser. Die Leute, vor allem Jugendliche, reagieren darauf, indem sie mit Steinen zurück werfen und Straßenbarrikaden aus Autoreifen, Müll, Möbelstücken und Steinen errichten und diese dann anzünden. Es ist ein Hin und Her. Immer wieder kommt die Polizei und es kommt zur Auseinandersetzung: Schießerei, Geschrei,…. Ich befürchte die gesamte Zeit über, dass sie mich entdecken, doch ich habe Glück. Sie sehen mich nicht.

Cut- Szenenwechsel:

Ein Junge liegt leicht bekleidet in einem Bett, sein Körper ist übersät mit Einschüssen, verursacht durch die Gummipatronen der Polizei. Ein anderer Junge hat den Kopf verbunden und die Nase ist mit Pflastern überbedeckt….Eine Frau richtet klar und deutlich einen Appell an die südafrikanische Regierung, sie fordert ein demokratisches, NICHT-rassendiskriminierendes Wahlsystem .

Diese Szenen wurden nie im südafrikanischen Fernsehen ausgestrahlt; sie gehören zu dem Archivmaterial der Videokollektive Afravision, welches die größte Videodokumentation der Widerstandsgeschichte darstellt. Gegründet wurde Afravision von Brian Tilley, Laurence Dworkin und Mokoenyana Moletse ,um die zahlreichen Kämpfe der 1980er Jahre in Südafrika zu dokumentieren.

Ein außergewöhnlicher und faszinierender Beitrag zur Berlinale 2010. Un-geschnitten und unverfälscht zeigt dieser Film schlicht und einfach die Realität und Wahrheit, wie sie sich tragischer weise im damaligen Südafrika zugetragen hat. Man erlebt Geschichte hautnah; man fühlt sich, als wenn man selbst dabei gewesen wäre. Es ist unglaublich, denn plötzlich ist es ist keine ,,Geschichte„ mehr, von der man mal im ,,Geschichtsbuch„ gelesen hat und die einem irreal und weit weg vorkommt. Es ist auf einmal auch meine eigene Realität. Ich bin dabei. Nach dem Film geht mir dann nur noch ein Gedanke durch den Kopf: Während ich in meine sichere Wirklichkeit des heutigen Deutschlands zurückkehren kann, ist dieser ,,Film„ für die Menschen in Südafrika damals weitergelaufen. Diese Menschen, denen man gerade begegnet ist, konnten im Gegensatz zu mir, die den Film ausschaltet, nicht fliehen. Für sie war es ein Albtraum, von dem sie nicht wussten, ob er jemals enden würde. Das ist einfach schrecklich.

Quellen:http://www.berlinale.de/de/programm/berlinale_programm/datenblatt.php?film_id=20110388

http://africanhistory.about.com/od/apartheid/p/crossroads.htm